Pain Care: Prevention Before Treatment

Author: Harry J. Gould, III, MD, PhD

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When a patient says, “Doctor, it hurts when I do this,” the immediate thought in response to the implied request is “Don’t do that.”  Unfortunately, in today’s society, this seems to be the best and most effective advice that a physician can provide for their patients in pain.

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The United States is in the midst of what the Centers for Disease Control describes as “The worst public health crisis in American history.”

There are reports, almost daily, to enlighten us about the fact that the over-prescribing of prescription painkillers has led to countless overdose deaths and serious consequences associated with misuse, abuse, addiction, and diversion that plague society in epidemic proportions.

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As a result, there has been a strong push by the community and regulatory agencies to limit the prescribing and dispensing of opioid analgesics across the board, while paying little attention to the underlying cause.

Pain is often under-treated or over-treated, but mostly it is poorly treated.

The system’s response has precipitated a reluctance on the part of many physicians to provide pain care for many in need, further exacerbating the primary cause of the problem.

A frequent response is to change clinical focus and redirect efforts to offer one-dimensional assessment and management that relies on interventional modalities.  Unfortunately, not all patients are identical and interventions, if ordered inappropriately or too often, can be costly and have problems of their own.

The observations and policies have mandated change and have heightened the efforts of healthcare providers to find ways to “do no harm” in their efforts to help those in need.

How then can we improve pain care and overall quality of life?  Perhaps it is time to return to basics.

As a starting point, we should consider some important truths about pain.

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The Truth About Pain

  • Pain is subjective and is different for everyone based on culture, situation, experience, genetics, age and gender.
  • Pain is a modality that is essential for survival. It warns us of present and potential tissue injury so that we can respond and minimize damage.
  • The most important reason that chronic pain is so debilitating is less the uncomfortable sensation that is experienced and more the fact that pain robs us of our ability to control of own lives. Unfortunately, many chronic pain conditions are present for a lifetime.  Thus, the realistic goal should be to minimize the effect of the underlying condition causing the pain and reclaim control of our lives rather than to eliminate pain.

Too often, patients surrender responsibility for controlling their pain to friends, physicians, physicians, drugs or procedures.

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Taking Responsibility for Your Pain

As a patient, it is essential for you to take responsibility for your pain and to participate in your own care. This process can begin by considering and implementing some obvious positive behavior changes that can maximize pain control and minimize both physical and fiscal cost.

Things You Can Do to Control Pain

  • Eat a regular healthy diet, avoiding excess, with a goal to optimize body mass index (BMI).
  • Exercise daily — regular activity from baseline to 30-60 min/day tailored to the patient’s ability to tolerate activity without a backward slide. “No pain, no gain” is not always the best approach.
  • Be sure to get enough restorative sleep.
  • Balance life experiences and schedule time for yourself that allows for participation in hobbies and enjoyable leisure activities.
  • Be aware of habitual activities and positions that add undo ergonomic stress, e.g., poor posture, wearing high heels, wearing shoes that lack adequate support, sleeping on an old or non-supportive mattress or pillow, using inadequately supportive chairs and car seats. Tailor work and living environments to minimize but not necessarily eliminate stressors and eliminate high-risk conditions.
  • Learn and take advantage of alternative forms of coping and pain control, e.g., meditation, guided imagery, self-hypnosis and relaxation.

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With proper perspective and attention to basics, one is likely to realize improved general conditioning that enhances:

  • Healing and the immune system’s ability to fight off infection and disease
  • Improved cardiovascular, pulmonary and gastrointestinal health
  • Reduced stress
  • Improved mental health
  • Increased sense of self and well-being and an overall improved quality of life
  • Reduction in pain at any level

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When setbacks occur, first consider the use of topical heat, cooling or massage and prudent physical activity to improve strength, range of motion and endurance and seek counsel for a comprehensive pain assessment early when the basics have not provided adequate results.

Suicide Prevention: Know the Signs and Where to Get Help

Author: David Fein, MD, Medical Director of  Behavioral Health Emergency Room Services

Suicide rates have been on the rise, now standing as the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. and the 2nd leading cause of death in teens. Now more than ever, it’s critical to know the signs that might indicate a person is considering suicide, where to go for help, and how to provide appropriate support and interventions.

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Risk Factors

While there are known risk factors for suicide, such as being older, male, or single, there are additional risk factors to be mindful of as well. These include dramatic changes in behavior, such as getting one’s affairs in order, giving away possessions, increasing substance use, and expressing feelings of being trapped, a sense of hopelessness, or the belief that there is no purpose or meaning to life.

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Many suicides occur during moments of extreme anxiety and hopelessness about the future. In fact, interviews of people who attempted suicide reveal that, oftentimes, they experienced profound regret about their decision almost immediately.

We should strive to never let temporary feelings of hopelessness drive us or a loved one to a permanent act like suicide. If you feel you are trapped with no way out and think the only solution is death, know that many resources are available to help you through the crisis.

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Where to Find Help

Each parish has a community mental health center and a mobile crisis unit that are available 24/7 to provide support for people in a behavioral health crisis. Calling the crisis unit does not necessarily mean you will be brought to the E.R. They are there to provide support to you – sometimes over the phone, sometimes in person.

Metropolitan Human Services District serves Orleans, St Bernard, and Plaquemines parishes. Call (504) 568-3130 for their clinic, and (504) 826-2675 for their mobile crisis unit. Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority serves Jefferson Parish. Call (504) 838-5257 for their clinic and (504) 832-5123 for their mobile crisis unit.

If a friend or loved one is in crisis and unwilling to seek help, another option is an Order of Protective Custody, which is signed off by the parish’s coroner and gives the police legal authority to bring the person to the hospital for an evaluation. To  request for an Order of Protective Custody in Orleans Parish,  call (504) 658-9660; in Jefferson Parish, call (504) 365-9100; in St. Tammany Parish, call (985) 781-1150.  

There are also national services such as the Suicide Hotline (1-800-273-8255) and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) (1-800-950-6264) which also has a Crisis Text Line (just text NAMI to 741-741). As always, emergency rooms and 911 are available 24/7 in case of an emergency.

Dr. Fein is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Associate Director of the LSU-Ochsner Psychiatry Residency Training Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine.

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The Unprocessed School Lunch

Author: Rosetta Danigole, Lead Dietitian at UMC

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Planning School Lunches

The school year is upon us.  Now is the one of the busiest times for both parents and kids as they settle into new schedules and routines. For many, a big part of that experience is thinking about and planning school lunches.

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In today’s society more children suffer from obesity, autoimmune disorders, Autism spectrum, ADHD and gut sensitivities and allergies.  Parents have to consider these concerns as well as how to pack not only a healthy school lunch but also an economical one as well.

Processed Foods

The processed food craze has certainly contributed to these disorders with the addition of the preservatives, other chemicals and gluten that some children may be sensitive to.

The summer is the time when parents may be more lenient about food choices but hope to get their kids back on track with the school year.

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Some Recommendations

Remember to always keep the school lunches balanced with lean protein such as poultry, fish, lean beef, eggs, nuts or other meat alternatives.

Make lunches fun by making sure you use some of your kids’ favorite foods and be imaginative by including fun shaped sandwiches, a nice note from you, and maybe some stickers.

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Here are some ideas for the Unprocessed School Lunch with special consideration for gluten free if needed for those kids with digestive complaints.

  • Fresh Raw produce such as apples, berries, cherries, bell peppers, and carrots.  Cut them up in bite sized pieces and add a fun dip such as hummus or a nut butter (check school policy regarding nuts in school lunch boxes)
  • Dried fruit such as raisins, craisins, and apple chips are also great options.
  • Hummus or Avocado dips- You may be surprised the number of kids like these “dips”.  Try adding carrots for a crispy treat.
  • Gluten free Granola Bars or protein bars- This makes a great snack for your kids.  You can find those made with dried fruits, coconut, and flax held together by honey.
  • Popcorn- This is always a healthy snack and treat and makes a tasty crunchy treat instead of potato chips.
  • Protein options- Try boiled eggs, fresh sliced turkey, or homemade chicken strips for the protein items.  Kids may also eat grass fed turkey or beef jerky for a change. If you make a sandwich you can try pita bread, bagels or gluten free bread if preferred and needed.
  • Homemade soup in a thermos- This is an old-fashioned wonderful option for your kids.  Nothing like mom’s homemade soup when it comes for lunch.  If gluten sensitive you can always use rice noodles and add nut floured crackers on the side.
  • Yogurt- Try adding a low sugar yogurt or a piece of string cheese for a calcium boost.

Most important when you have the chance introduce kids to new foods and make sure the dinner meal is full of healthy vegetables, complex carbohydrates and lean protein.

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About the Author

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As the lead dietitian at University Medical Center New Orleans, Rosetta Danigole manages clinical dietetic operations. She is a member of the Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition and belongs to the clinical dietitian practice group. She has been a dietitian for 35 years.

 

Family Ties: Genetics and Breast Cancer

By Alix D’Angelo, Certified Genetic Counselor

While most breast cancers occur sporadically (usually linked to environmental factors such as smoking cigarettes and hormone replacement therapy), up to 10% are hereditary. Hereditary breast cancers are caused by DNA mutations that are typically passed down in families for generations.

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Individuals with a personal or family history with the following features may want to consider genetic counseling and genetic testing:

  • Young cancers (particularly under age 50)
  • Multiple family members with the same types of cancers
  • Multiple cancers in the same person
  • Rare cancer types (such as male breast cancer and ovarian cancer)

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Identifying individuals who have a gene mutation leading to a hereditary form of breast cancer is important, as there are screening, treatment and risk reduction options that can be life-saving.

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Genetic Counseling and Genetic Testing

While most people may be familiar with the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which account for about half of hereditary breast cancers, there are over a dozen other genes that have been implicated in breast cancer risk, including genes such as ATM, CHEK2and PALB2.

Panel genetic testing that includes all of these genes and more is now available for individuals who meet medical criteria.GettyImages-865900230.jpgIf you think that you or a family member may warrant genetic testing for hereditary forms of breast cancer, speak with a genetic counselor or your doctor.

Alix D’Angelo, MGC,Angela D'Angelo.jpg CGC,  is an Instructor at LSU Health New Orleans Instructor and a Genetic Counselor at UMC New Orleans.

Join her on August 29th for the next talk in the series of Susan G. Komen-New Orleans lunch lectures,  “Family Ties: Genetics and Breast Cancer.” It will take place 12 – 1 p.m. in the UMC New Orleans Conference Center, First Floor. Lunch will be provided. Click here to RSVP.

 

Protect your Children: Get them Vaccinated

By Gail Burke, DO, Family Medicine Physician

GettyImages-532334752.jpgWith a new school season starting, many parents are making lists to make sure their child has everything to begin the school year prepared. Protecting your child’s health should be number one on your list.

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One of the best ways to keep your children healthy is to get them vaccinated. From newborn to college age, you can protect your children from 16 serious diseases, including polio, meningitis, diphtheria, flu, rotavirus and tetanus. Vaccinations work! Some terrible diseases that ravaged human beings for centuries were eliminated with the discovery of vaccination, such as the dreaded small pox virus, which the World Health Organization declared globally eradicated in 1979.

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Vaccinations save lives

Before vaccines, many children died from diseases that vaccines now prevent, such as polio, measles and whooping cough. Those same germs exist today; because most children are vaccinated, we don’t see those diseases as often. Vaccination not only protects your child; it also protects the other children in the classroom and school, by something known as “herd immunity.” Germs can travel quickly through a community, such as your child’s classroom, and make a lot of children sick. If enough people get sick it can lead to an outbreak. But when enough children are vaccinated against a disease, the germs can’t travel as easily from person to person and the whole group is less likely to get the disease. That is “herd immunity!”

As a very busy parent, you’ve got enough to keep track of with your child’s multiple school and afterschool activities.  Keeping track of a vaccination schedule is one less thing for you to worry about, because your child’s doctor will do this job.

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Well-child visits and immunizations

Vaccinations are designed to be given automatically during well-child visits. Your family doctor or pediatrician will schedule these well-child visits and keep track of your child’s vaccinations and give you a health record with the history of your child’s vaccinations. This record is often required by your child’s school and other programs to ensure the health of all the children. And don’t worry. If your children have missed any vaccines, your doctor can use a “catch up” vaccination schedule to get them back on track.

There are free resources to help parents such as the CDC charts, “2018 Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 Years old” and the “Recommended Immunizations for Children 6 years old through 18 years old.”

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Vaccination safety

Some parents are confused and worried about vaccinations. They’ve heard that vaccinations can cause autism or long-term neurologic problems. Moms and Dads want to do what’s in the best interest of their children. All parents, and children, deserve the best science-based information on this topic. The CDC and many scientific groups have done extensive research on vaccine safety; their studies continue to find there is no scientific basis for this claim. Based on these major research findings, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Medicine support vaccinations for all children, infancy through college age. You are encouraged to bring your questions and concerns to your family doctor.

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Additional benefits of vaccinations

There is another important benefit for parents who vaccinate their children. Their children are less likely to develop the childhood illnesses which require time off school for kids and time off work for parents. It also cuts down on need for doctor’s visits, and with very sick children, the need for hospitalization.

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Programs that can help

Vaccinations can be expensive and many families cannot afford to pay for vaccines on their own. If you are unable to afford vaccinations for your child or if the vaccinations are not covered by your health insurance, do not let this stand in the way of protecting your child. He or she may be eligible for programs such as the Vaccines for Children program, a federal program established in 1998.

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Finding your ‘Medical Home’

When you register as a patient at the UMC/LSU Family Medicine Clinic, this becomes your “Medical Home,” for you and every member of your family, no matter his or her age. One of the key beliefs of family medicine is disease prevention! We are dedicated to promoting your child’s health, through vaccinations and lifelong education on healthy lifestyle. We believe that vaccinations are one of the best lifelong strategies to prevent serious life threatening diseases and keep you and your loved ones healthy.

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Dr. Gail Burke is a board certified family physician in the UMC/LSU Family Medicine Clinic. To learn more about Family Medicine at UMC, visit http://www.umcno.org/familymedicine or call (504) 962-6363 to schedule an appointment.

Bounce for the Ounce: The Energy of Fruits and Vegetables

By Mary Thoesen Coleman, MD, PhD, FAAFP

Fruits and vegetables are packed with nutrients and minerals needed for our body’s health. They provide lots of energy (bounce) for the amount you eat (ounce).

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Fruits and Veggies are strong components of the Mediterranean diet, which in a number of research studies has been associated with decreased risk for cardiovascular disease.
In people who follow the Mediterranean diet, the good kind of cholesterol, HDL, increases, triglycerides reduce, and so do fasting blood sugar and blood pressure.

The Mediterranean diet emphasizes eating plant foods such as vegetables, fruits, plus nuts and seeds.

How much? We should eat more than 2 servings per meal of non-starchy vegetables (starchy vegetables such as potatoes, peas, and corn do not count) and 1- 2 servings per meal of fruit.

  • A vegetable serving is ½ cup of cooked vegetables or 1 cup of raw vegetables.
  • A fruit serving is one small fruit or ½ cup fruit juice or ¼ cup dried fruit.

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Is fresh best?

The best choices of fruits and vegetables are those that are minimally processed, locally grown, and fresh.

Frozen fruits and vegetables are reasonable alternatives to fresh. Canned fruits and veggies are less beneficial due to loss of minerals and nutrients in processing and addition of salt and preservatives.

Such vegetables and fruit are also good sources of fiber.

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MyPlate recommendations

MyPlate is the current nutrition guide published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. MyPlate is a visual reminder about the right mix of fruits, vegetables, grains and proteins.

Fruits and vegetables make up half of food on a meal plate, with veggies a greater proportion of the half than fruits.

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Things I have learned:

  • You can get too much of a good thing. Smoothies or juices made from fresh ingredients can concentrate too much of good thing. For example, juicers frequently add spinach to smoothies and blended juices but spinach is high in oxalates and when consumed frequently in concentrated form with low Calcium diet may put you at risk for kidney stones made from oxalates. (I believe I contributed to my own kidney stone experience by drinking too many juices packed with spinach and not having enough Calcium in my diet).
  • If you drink too much fruit juice, you can elevate your blood sugar. In one of my patients with diabetes, making one change in his diet (eliminating fruit juices) brought his sugar from very poorly controlled to completely controlled.
  • If you eat too many fruits, you can also elevate your blood sugar. One of my patients who was eating 12 bananas a day was unable to control her blood sugar despite high doses of medication until she lowered her banana intake.
  • Fruit drinks (not fruit juices) do not have the nutrients present in fruit juices and typically add calories without being healthy choices.

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Tips for adding veggies to your diet:

  • Cut up fresh vegetables (I use different ones including asparagus, cabbage, mushrooms, onion, broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts) and cook them in olive oil. Eat for breakfast, lunch, or supper. Olive oil is a healthy part of the Mediterranean diet and it helps to make the vegetables more filling.
  • Cut up fresh vegetables and put them in plastic containers for lunch snacks. I like to cut up yellow and red peppers, radishes, cucumbers, and broccoli.
  • Make a fun salad that includes lots of colorful veggies and fruits–several lettuce varieties (Romaine, butternut), arugula if available, nuts such as walnuts or pecans or pine nuts, pumpkin seeds or other seeds, fresh vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, red peppers, yellow peppers, radishes, green onions, a dash of blueberries or strawberries, maybe some coconut flakes or cilantro or parsley. If desired, add left-over cooked chicken or tuna. Mix with home-made dressing from extra virgin olive oil (1 part olive oil ), 3 parts vinegar (mostly white but some apple cider vinegar), 1-3 tsps. Dijon mustard, and black pepper.
  • Fresh fruits make good desserts and I like to add to yogurt (a good source of Calcium and part of the Mediterranean diet) for a healthy dessert or to whipped cream without sugar.

Mediterranean diet-friendly options

Vegetables

Artichokes, arugula, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, celery, celeriac, chicory, collard greens, cucumbers, dandelion greens, eggplant, fennel, kale, leeks, lemons, lettuce, mache, mushrooms, mustard greens, nettles, okra, onions (red, sweet, white), peas, peppers, potatoes, pumpkin, purslane, radishes, rutabaga, scallions, shallots, spinach, sweet potatoes, turnips, zucchini.

Fruits

Apples, apricots, avocados, cherries, clementines, dates, figs, grapefruits, grapes, melons, nectarines, olives, oranges, peaches, pears, pomegranates, strawberries, tangerines, tomatoes.

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Dr. Coleman is a physician in the Family Medicine Clinic at UMC and is the Marie Lahasky Chair and Professor for the Department of Family Medicine, Director of Community Health and Director of Rural Education at LSU Health New Orleans. To learn more about Family Medicine at UMC, visit http://www.umcno.org/familymedicine or call (504) 962-6363 to schedule an appointment.

Essential Immunizations for Adults

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You want to pass on certain things like family traditions, a grandmother’s quilt or dad’s love of books—but no one wants to pass on a serious illness. Take charge of your health and help protect those around you by asking about vaccines at your next doctor’s visit.

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Vaccines

Vaccinating our children is commonplace in the United States. But many adults don’t know which vaccines they need, and even fewer are fully vaccinated. Every year, thousands of adults in the U.S. become needlessly ill from infectious diseases. Many adults are hospitalized and some even die from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines.

Not only can vaccine-preventable diseases make you very sick, but if you get sick, you may risk spreading certain diseases to others. That’s a risk most of us do not want to take.

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Babies, older adults and people with weakened immune systems (like those undergoing cancer treatment) are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases. They are also more likely to have severe illness and complications if they do get sick.

You can help protect your health and the health of your loved ones by getting your recommended vaccines.

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The good news is that getting vaccinated is easier than you think. Adults can get vaccinated at their primary care doctor’s office, pharmacies, workplaces, health clinics and health departments.

Most health insurance plans cover the cost of recommended vaccines—a call to your insurance provider can give you the details.

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What vaccines do you need?

All adults should get:

  • Annual flu vaccine to protect against seasonal flu
  • Td/Tdap to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough)

Some additional vaccines you may need (depending on your age, health conditions and other factors) include:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Meningococcal
  • Pneumococcal
  • Shingles

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Traveling overseas?

There may be additional vaccines you need depending on the location. Find out here. 

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Still not sure what vaccines you may need?

Take this short quiz.

Be a Good Sport: Tips for Preventing Youth Sports Injuries

Author: Patricia Clesi, RN, UMC Trauma Services Coordinator

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Youth participation in organized sports offers excellent benefits socially and physically, including reducing the risk of childhood obesity.

However, almost 1/3 of all injuries incurred in childhood are sports-related.

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In fact, high school athletes account for about 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A 2016 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said knee injuries, ankle sprains and concussions are among the most common outcomes in studies identifying risk factors for sports-related injuries. One study from the National Health Interview Survey even showed that sports, on average, account for 14 percent of all emergency department visits for life-threatening injuries, the majority of which (32%) come from those 18 and younger.

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Despite the scary statistics, more and more American children are participating in youth sports in recent years.

To make sure you or your child are not part of the numbers and prevent injury, consider these 5 simple, but potentially lifesaving, tips during this National Youth Sports Week:

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1. Warm Up

Time should always be set aside for warm up and stretching before playing sports. This will help prevent injury to muscles during play.  All major muscles groups should hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds.

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2. Gear Up

Appropriate and properly fitted sports gear should be used always. Helmets should be well maintained, age appropriate, and worn correctly.  There are no “concussion proof” helmets, however, it will help prevent skull fractures and traumatic brain injuries.

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3. Hydrate

Hydration before, during and after practice and games are very important to prevent dehydration, especially in the summer months.

Water is the best option to hydrate athletes.

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4. Rest

Overuse injuries are common, especially in youth playing on multiple teams of the same sport at the same time. Rest will help avoid these injuries.

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5. Report

Players should be encouraged to report any pain, injury or illness to their coaches and parents.

For more child safety tips, visit http://www.umcno.org/injuryprevention.

Summertime Skincare

Author: Brian D. Lee, MD, UMC Dermatologist and Kelly R. Stewart Chairman of the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Department of Dermatology

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The warmth of summer sunshine draws many people outdoors to participate in a variety of activities during these beautiful days.

It’s important to protect your skin from the damaging potential of sunlight.

This article focuses on the simple steps necessary to avoid sun damage and maximize your fun in the sun.

The Truth about Tanning

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First thing’s first: There is no such thing as a healthy tan. Tanned skin is simply an indication of damaged skin. People who tan dramatically increase their risk of developing skin cancer and destroying the elasticity of the skin, causing sagging, leather-like skin that will make them look much older than their actual age.

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Artificial sun tanners afford no protection against the harmful rays of the sun and may give one a false sense of protection. People with dark skin need to wear sunblocks because their darker natural skin color does not afford them enough protection.

The Damaging Effects of the Sun

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The damaging effects of the sun includes the induction of:

  • Skin cancers
  • Premature aged appearance
  • Sun induced eye diseases including eye cancers, and increased risk of cataracts and glaucoma.

Protecting Yourself and Your Children

To protect oneself from the sun, sunblocks, sunglasses, and sun protective clothing must be used.

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Children less than 6 months of age should not use sun blocks because of concerns regarding their absorption of the sunblock ingredients. They should wear loose fitting, long sleeve shirts and pants, wear a hat of tightly knit material (when held up to light there should be darkness inside cap) and sunglasses where are labelled to protect against the two types of sun rays: UVA and UVB.

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Everyone should limit their outdoor exposure between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Shade areas may contain 80% of non-shaded areas. It is best to be inside at the peak sunlight intensity hours.

Sunscreen

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Sunblock should be of a SPF of 30 or greater and the container should also indicate 100% blockage of UVA sunlight.

One ounce of sunblock (a small jigger) is necessary to rub into the skin 20 to 30 minutes prior to sun exposure to allow sunblock absorption. Spray sunblocks should be sprayed onto the hands and rubbed into the skin to avoid eye exposure.

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There are two types of sun blocks: physical and chemical. Physical sun blocks contain zinc oxide and titanium dioxide and protect by causing reflection the harmful rays. These are excellent products which eliminate the risk of allergic reactions to ingredients in chemical sun blocks. They are available in lotions, gels and sprays.  Most sun blocks sold are chemical sun blocks.

While the potential for allergic reaction (rashes/itching) is very rare, the possibility exists. When shopping for chemical sunblocks read the ingredient label and look for a product that contains avobenzone and does not contain oxybenzone. Oxybenzone may have a possible link to the production of hormone imbalances (low testosterone). Clear spray sunblocks are favorites of men for applying to their skin. Perspiration, degradation and swimming eliminate the sunblocks, so application every 2 hours is recommended.

Grab your sunblock, sun glasses and a hat and have a wonderful day at the beach!

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Top Items to Keep in Your Hurricane “Go-Bag”

Author: Melissa Mitchell, UMC Emergency Management Coordinator

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Hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. People living around the Atlantic coastline and the Gulf of Mexico should take note of the proper precautions for this hurricane season. Listed below are the top items every household should have ready to go in the event of a hurricane.

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1. Personal Identification

Consider including copies of the following items for each family member:

  • a driver’s license
  • social security card
  • birth/marriage certificates
  • vehicle registration
  • proof of insurance
  • will and insurance documents
  • property deeds

The best way to keep track of all information is to have it in a waterproof container or a binder, labeled, with a protective sleeve on it. During hurricane season there is always the potential threat of flooding and damaging important papers. The best solution for this problem would be to have all of it packaged and ready to go. And don’t forget to bring cash! ATM’s may not be operating.

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2. First Aid-Kit

To be prepared, a first aid kit is a must.  It would contain all health-related items and medicines a family may need, especially prescription medications. Each family member should have a list of medications that are prescribed to them and other important health concerns in this kit.   Include things like waterless hand cleaners, antibacterial soap, and sunblock.

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3. Toiletries

An emergency pack should always hold any toiletries a person would use daily. It is best to change out these items every hurricane season due to expiration dates. Items like deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, and personal should be included.

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4. Bottled Water

Water is a necessity and having it ready and bottled to go is essential. Each person should have one gallon of water per day.

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5. Food

At least 4 days’ worth for each person. It is best to pack the following types of food:

  • High Energy Foods: Along with water, high energy foods should be considered as well. High energy foods are foods that do not contain a high amount of water and would fill a person’s stomach up more. The best option to stack up on would be peanut butter, crackers, and protein or energy bars.
  • Pre-Packaged, Non-Perishable Food Items: Food items like oatmeal, mac and cheese, fruit snacks, and chips/pretzels are pre-packaged food that last a long time. A family should pack enough to accommodate family size and the pack should be updated and checked every hurricane season.

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6. Electronics

  • Flashlight: Each family member should have their own flashlight. Wind-up flashlights work very well and don’t require batteries.
  • Lantern: Even though flashlights are on the list, a lantern would be a good thing to have as well. The lantern would help in larger rooms and are easier to use if a person needs two hands to do a job.
  • Radio: The radio should be battery operated and the frequency for the weather channel can be taped to the radio itself.
  • Batteries: Batteries are a must have for being prepared for any inclement weather season.
  • Cell phone charger, computer cords, and a wind-up or solar powered cell phone charger.

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7. Clothes and Shoes

Enough for 4 days per person. Be sure you have:

  • Rain jacket
  • Protective shoes
  • Hat for shade

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8. Pets

  • Pet food
  • Veterinarian info & medications
  • Bottle water and bowls
  • Carrier or crate
  • Bedding
  • Tags, collar, and leash
  • Plastic refuse bags or litter

With the top items listed above, every family should print and review the Louisiana Emergency Preparedness Guide.  This guide will have everything a Louisiana resident should have on hand to be prepared this hurricane season.

For more information on Emergency Preparedness or helpful tips, visit: 

 

For up-to-date emergency alerts, follow your local news and weather channels.

Click here to watch how to pack a basic storm survival kit.