6 Health Screenings to Help Women Prevent Disease

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May is women’s health month, a perfect time to remind the caregivers of the family to take care of themselves.

Don’t let heart disease, stroke, and other serious health conditions sneak up on you. Instead, prevent them by seeing your doctor for a yearly well-woman checkup

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At your checkup, your doctor will likely suggest health screenings. These tests can help spot potentially deadly conditions before they become life-threatening.

 

Here are 6 health screenings every woman needs in order to help prevent disease and stay healthy.

How many have you checked off your list?

1. Blood pressure

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Nearly half of all Americans older than age 20 have chronic high blood pressure—130/80 mmHg or greater. Getting your blood pressure checked, and changing your lifestyle or using medication, if necessary, can reduce your risk for stroke and heart disease.

2. Cholesterol

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This simple blood test—after an overnight fast—measures levels of HDL, or “good,” cholesterol and LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol, as well as triglycerides. These fats in your blood can affect your risk for heart disease and stroke.

3. Pap test

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This test, as part of a pelvic exam, takes a sample of cells from the cervix to check for cervical cancer. Women ages 21 to 29 should get a Pap test every three years. From ages 30 to 65, you should get screened every three to five years. Cervical cancer and the beginning stages of the disease are treatable if caught early.

4. Mammogram

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This breast X-ray can find breast cancer in its early, most treatable stages. Talk with your doctor if you’re between ages 40 and 49 about when to start getting a mammogram. If you’re between ages 50 and 74, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends a screening every two years.

5. Blood glucose

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This simple blood test helps detect type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, which can increase the risk for heart disease and other complications. It’s recommended for adults ages 40 to 70 who are overweight.

6. Colonoscopy

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During this test, the doctor will examine your colon, looking for signs of cancer and small growths that can become cancerous over time, which can be removed during the test. Experts recommend getting a colonoscopy starting at age 50.

Consider bringing a copy of your family health history to your checkup.

Create one here.

 

Eyes on the Road: The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Author: Bridget Gardner, Injury Prevention Coordinator

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Have you ever been on a cell phone and passed your exit? Have you reached for an item in your vehicle or taken your eyes of the road just for a second, only to find yourself swerving to avoid the car ahead?

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When you are in your car, a moment’s distraction can easily have more devastating consequences.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 9% of the fatal crashes in the U.S. were caused by distracted driving and 3,450 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.

Distractions aren’t just cell phones. Distracted driving is any activity that diverts your attention away from the primary task of driving.

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Distractions include adjusting a radio, GPS or MP3 player, texting, talking on a cell phone, updating social media, selecting a song list, talking to passengers, eating, drinking, grooming, like shaving or applying makeup, reading, and diverting your attention to crashes and billboards.

If you remove your eyes off the road for 4.6 seconds, at 55 mph, you will drive the length of a football field.  So, you’re basically driving blindfolded for the length of the football field. This not only places you at risk, it places every driver on the road at risk.

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Cell phones are a primary distraction, because it involves three types of distraction simultaneously:

  • Visual (taking your eyes off the road)
  • Manual (taking your hands off the wheel), and
  • Cognitive (taking your mind off driving).

In the fractions of a second in which you need to identify a danger, process the decision, react and respond to the hazard, there isn’t enough time when you do not remain focused or your attention isn’t on driving.

Forty-four states, including Louisiana, ban text messaging for all drivers. Fourteen states prohibit hand-held cell phone use by drivers.

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Currently, Louisiana has a bill to propose the use of hands free devices only for drivers.

University Medical Center, which is home to the region’s only Level I Trauma Center, has a strong commitment to the prevention of injuries due to distracted driving. The Trauma Center’s Injury Prevention Team is committed to decreasing the risk of injury through programs such as Sudden Impact.

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Twice per week, high school sophomores attend the hospital-based program to understand the real consequences to such high-risk behavior. Helping them understand the risks of distracted driving is essential – after all, 76% of participants state that they have been in a crash or near crash because the driver of the vehicle was distracted.

Distracted driving is also written into the script for the Sudden Impact Mock Crash, “Consequences of Impact” and the Mock Trial, “Lifetime of Consequences.”

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We encourage you to not be the next victim.

Reduce cell phone distractions

If there is an option to turn your phone off or send automatic replies to texts while driving, this is highly recommended.

It can wait

Most conversations and texts can wait and if they cannot, pull to a safe, well-lit area to return the call or text.

Safety first

Be a role model to the passengers in your vehicle. If you have a call or text that needs to be returned, have a passenger return the call or text for you.

Eyes on the road

Keep your eyes on the road and always be aware of your surroundings.

Drive defensively

Be ready to avoid a crash by driving defensively.

Remember, crashes are PREVENTABLE.

Open Up: The Truth About Oral Cancer

Author: Rohan Walvekar, MD, Co-Director of ENT Services at UMC

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Oral cancer will be responsible for over 10,000 deaths and will affect over 50,000 people in the United States in 2018.

These numbers may surprise you, because, in general, oral cancers are not thought of as commonly occurring; however, Louisiana is one of the states with highest incidence of oral and pharyngeal cancers in the United States.

What is the rate of these cancers in Louisiana?

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April honors Oral Cancer Awareness, and is a good time to learn about the signs, symptoms and treatment of oral cancer, as well as the importance of early detection.

What are oral cancers and why should we care about these cancers?

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Oral cancers are cancers that affect parts of our mouth such as the gums, tongue or palate. They are most commonly caused by tobacco use and alcohol consumption. There is a new threat called Human Papilloma Virus (HPV-16) that can also cause certain types of oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

These cancers are important because they have a devastating effect on a person’s ability to communicate with the world around them by affecting speech and swallowing, breathing and appearance; treatment, which is most commonly involves surgical removal, may also have an serious impact on these functions that are so vital to us.

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Surgical management is the ideal treatment for oral cancers but comes with the possibility of a disfiguring operation (e.g. removal of jaw bone or tongue affecting appearance or speech) and loss of function.

Early detection of oral cancer plays a vital role improving quality of life and function by limiting extent of surgery and consequently side effects of treatment.

In addition, it’s important to note that early-stage tumors (i.e. tumors detected at an earlier stage of the disease) have better chances of cure (5-year disease-free survival: 60-80 percent) as compared to cancers diagnosed when they are too large or advanced (5-year disease-free survival rates: 30-40 percent).

Unlike other types of cancers that may miss detection until they are too advanced; oral cancers can be diagnosed earlier with inspection and a biopsy – both of which can be easily done during an oral cavity examination by an expert in the clinic or at a cancer-screening event.

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Patients who notice a sore, ulcer or growth in the mouth that has not responded to treatment or a lump in the neck (oral cancers can spread to lymph nodes in the neck) that does not go away either after treatment or spontaneously in 2-3 weeks, should get check by an oral cavity expert such as an ENT surgeon or Head & Neck Cancer Surgeon.

The slogan that the Head Neck Cancer Alliance (OHANCAW) promotes –“All you have to do is open your mouth” is a testament to how a simple cancer screening can save lives and improve outcomes for oral cancer patients who are diagnosed early.

Get screened – promote screening – save lives!

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Click here to learn more about our Cancer Services and future screenings.

To make an appointment with an ENT, visit our website here. 

About Dr. Walvekar

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Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, earned his doctoral degree from the University of Mumbai. After graduating in 1998, he completed a residency in Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery at the TN Medical College & BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, India, with triple honors. Subsequently, he completed two head neck surgery fellowships, and trained at at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, which is India’s most prestigious cancer institute, catering to over 5000 new head neck cancer registrations a year. After completing an Advanced Head Neck Oncologic Surgery fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, he became an Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center, prior to joining the LSU Health Sciences Center in July 2008. His clinical interests are head neck surgery and salivary endoscopy. His research interests include evaluating prognostic markers and clinical outcomes of head and neck cancer therapy and treatment of salivary gland disorders.

Give to Live: How My Son Saved 54 Lives

Author: Amy Deubler Foy, Mother of former UMC patient Cameron Dice 

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On Sunday, March 11, my son, Cameron Dice, was riding his 4-wheeler across a piece of land near our home until it flipped over on him and crushed his skull. He was brought by ambulance to a small hospital in Franklinton, LA and from there, he was air lifted by helicopter to University Medical Center New Orleans. Upon arrival, he was on a ventilator and the outlook did not look very promising, but still, we prayed for a miracle to happen.

He arrived at UMC Sunday afternoon around 3 p.m. Their amazing nurses and doctors worked on him to try and save his life. But, unfortunately, the damage to his brain was too severe and there was little that they could do. On Monday night, March 12 at 7:28 pm, at the age of 19, he was legally pronounced dead.

My family and I made the decision prior to the final apnea test that would determine whether his brain had any activity:

If Cameron did not have any chance at survival, we wanted him to be an organ donor. 

This was a decision that Cameron had made not long before his accident –  just 2 years prior at the DMV when he received his driver’s license.

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The decision to save other’s lives when yours cannot be saved seems, to me, to be the only decision. I stand firm in this decision even more so now after Cameron’s death. Why would you not want to save someone else’s child, mother, father, brother, sister, etc.?

Cameron becoming an organ donor was not only the right decision for others, but it also gave me 50 more hours to hold his hand, kiss him, stroke his hair and tell him everything I needed to tell him before he was taken into surgery.

Those 4 days were the absolute hardest days I have ever experienced, but that little bit of extra time has made the pain of all this a little easier. I am so grateful that I had those days to just hold my baby and tell him goodbye.

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If Cameron would have been on the other side, needing a transplant for an organ to save his life, I would hope and pray that others would give the gift of life to save my baby.

My Cameron, my angel, now lives in 54 different people between his organs, bones, skin, muscles, tendons, veins, arteries, etc. 

While he was here on earth, he touched so many people’s hearts and lives and now that he has passed on, he still is doing the same.

I cannot explain how proud I am that my baby is truly a hero to these people that now have a chance at life because of Cameron. There is little to no comfort that anyone can provide to a mother that loses their child, but knowing that my baby is still around me physically walking around in all of these people helps tremendously.

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If you are an organ or tissue recipient, please – I beg you – reach out to the family who saved your life.  I pray for the day to meet the people that my child now lives through!

There is no reason, in my eyes, for people to not be an organ donor.  If you can save another person from going through the pain that my family is enduring, why wouldn’t you?

The people with LOPA (Louisiana Organ Procurement Agency) were absolutely amazing.  Everyone was very considerate of me and my family the whole time while they prepared Cameron for his surgery.  They have kept in touch with me and have offered me support with their kind words.

I just received a letter from them giving me the sex and age bracket that Cameron’s major organs went to. I pray to meet every single one of them!!

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April is National Donate Life Month, which honors organ, tissue and eye donors and their loved ones. One organ donor can save the lives of up to nine people.  

At University Medical Center, our dedicated professionals have helped, in coordination with LOPA, to save the lives of over 95 organ recipients in the past year.

Please join us on April 16 at 1:30 p.m. near the flagpole at UMC’s Galvez Street entrance for a LOPA flag-raising and butterfly release to honor the silent heroes at UMC and their families.

Simple Stretches for those Stretched Too Thin

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Stretching is an important part of every workout, but it also has benefits beyond the gym. Stretching improves flexibility, helps maintain a good range of motion in your joints and also relieves stress. Stretching can be done at home, work or on the go. Here are some simple stretching exercises for busy people.

Remember to listen to your body as you stretch and stop if you feel pain of any kind.

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Wrists

Reach your arms out in front of you. Rotate your wrists 10 times in a clockwise direction, then 10 times counterclockwise.

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Arms and Hands

Clasp your hands together in front of your chest at shoulder height. Extend your arms forward until you feel a stretch in your upper back, shoulders, arms, and hands. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat for 30 seconds.

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Arms

Lift one arm in front of you as if to grab something. Then use the other arm to pull the outstretched arm gently across the chest so that the muscles are stretched. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat for another 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat, using your left arm.

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Neck

Close your eyes. Drop your ear to your shoulder and hold for 15 seconds. Roll your chin across your chest to the other shoulder and hold for 15 seconds. Repeat.

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Overhead Reach

Inhale slowly and deeply. Raise arms overhead. Exhale completely and release. Repeat.

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Chest

Bring your arms behind your back and link your fingers with your palms facing inward. Straighten your arms and lift them up until you feel a stretch in your arms, shoulders, and chest. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat the stretch for another 15 to 30 seconds.

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Back

Sit tall in your chair and try to turn to grab the back of the chair while keeping your feet flat on the floor. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat the stretch turning to the other side.

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Hips

Cross one ankle onto the opposite knee and sit tall. Then, lean forward from your hips, keeping your chest upright. This stretches the outer hip, which is the reason for many back problems. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat using the other leg.

The Benefits of Breakfast

Author: Rosetta Danigole, Lead Nutritionist at UMC

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Are You a Breakfast Eater?

Studies show that there are many benefits to choosing a healthy breakfast every morning.

First, there’s the energy factor. Your brain needs glucose from food – especially good carbohydrates such as whole grains, fresh fruits and low-fat dairy products – in order to work well.

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What Happens When You Skip Breakfast

When you skip breakfast you may end up with a brain-energy slump by mid-morning.

Skipping the benefits of breakfast can lead to an increase in LDL (“bad” cholesterol) levels, according to researchers.

Going without breakfast means you likely will eat more throughout the day. People who eat breakfast, on the other hand, get their metabolism humming and tend not to consume as many calories during the entire day, so they wind up weighing less than those who don’t get the benefits of eating breakfast.

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You may be jeopardizing your long-term health. One study found that those who skipped breakfast were more resistant to insulin. Insulin resistance increases the risk of developing diabetes.

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If you are not a breakfast eater and have a hard time eating in the morning you may just have a bad habit.  To start breaking that habit try a light breakfast such as a banana and a glass of milk or even a cup of low fat low-sugar yogurt and fruit.  You may just need to re-train your system to accepting food in the morning.

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Lastly, what are the good and bad breakfast choices?

  • Try not to load up on caffeine — one cup is a good limit, but if you need two cups maybe try a cup of hot tea as it is higher in antioxidants.
  • Avoid muffins, large bagels, sweet pastries, sweetened cereal, & high-fat meats such as bacon.
  • Eggs are good choices (high in protein and not the cholesterol offender as once thought). Studies say to it is good to include eggs 3 to 4 times per week; preferably organic and high in omega 3 fatty acids.
  • Try whole grains coupled with high quality protein such as eggs and oatmeal or yogurt and fruit.
  • Don’t forget the healthy fats such as almonds/walnuts/or flax seeds.

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…But What About Grits?

Here in New Orleans we love grits and a lot of folks ask dietitians about that. Grits are made from corn and is not that bad in and of itself but it is a refined food. Include it occasionally for breakfast but not daily as other options offer more nutrients.

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About the Author

Rosetta

As the lead dietitian at University Medical Center New Orleans, Rosetta Danigole manages clinical dietetic operations. She is a member of the Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition and belongs to the clinical dietitian practice group. She has been a dietitian for 35 years.

 

The Link Between Diet, Obesity and Cancer

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A diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables and good sources of protein are important for good health, but did you know that what you eat can also affect your risk for cancer?

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The good news is that diet and obesity are things that can be controlled through healthful choices and a greater understanding of how our bodies process certain foods.

The link between cancer and diet is the topic of the UMC Cancer Center’s next Breast Health Lunch Lecture, presented by Adam Riker, MD., F.A.C.S. Dr. Riker is an LSU Health New Orleans surgical oncologist and Oncology Service Line Director at UMC.

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The free lecture takes place from 12 – 1 p.m. in the UMC Conference Center, on the first floor of UMC, 2000 Canal Street. Lunch will be provided, and a Q&A will follow.

During the lecture Dr. Riker will share a wealth of information, including the basics of cancer, how many people develop cancer, and most importantly, why people develop cancer.

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According to the World Cancer Research Fund, one of the biggest risk factors for cancer is being overweight or obese. Eating food that is high in fat or sugar can lead to weight gain, and there is strong evidence that being overweight or obese increases the risk of 11 cancers.

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Dr. Riker’s lecture will explore why having too much sugar in our diets is not only dangerous, but potentially deadly, the effects of wheat, flour, gluten and process foods (most of which contain flour and wheat) on our overall health, the effects of dairy consumption and the most common pesticide/herbicide in the U.S. food chain and its impact on the vast majority of food consumed in the U.S.

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In the second half of his lecture, Dr. Riker will drill down on how our body processes food, especially sugar and wheat. Sugar is linked to insulin resistance, weight gain, high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Gluten, a protein in wheat, has been linked to a number of ailments, including inflammation, intestinal disorders and autoimmune disorders.

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He will discuss the dietary guidelines in the food pyramid and affect on childhood and adult obesity.

The Standard American Diet

1970: 2,077 calories

1990: 2,343 calories

2010: 2,590 calories

Additionally, “I’ll focus upon the striking increase in obesity and diabetes (and other health problems) as a result of the U.S diet and then discuss what we can do about it, in order to live a healthy, happy, fulfilled and cancer-free lifestyle,” Dr. Riker said.

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Know Your Numbers

Authors: Alan Gatz, MD and Kendria Holt-Rogers, MD, UMC Primary Care Physicians

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Today,  many people are aware of the need to focus on the effect of risk factors and life choices on overall health and wellness. Health professionals speak to patients about cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, BMI (body-mass index), and hemoglobin A1c, but many individuals become overwhelmed and do not totally understand all of the information as presented.

Here’s a condensed and simplified description of the above mentioned health determinants.

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Cholesterol

This term actually should be changed to lipids, which includes the entire family of proteins sub-divided into three major subcategories:

  1. LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol
  2. HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and
  3. Triglycerides (TG).

The two numbers the majority of people need to remember are their LDL and HDL levels.

A simple way to understand the concept of reducing heart and vascular disease is to keep the low low and the high high. LDL level above 150 mg% increases the risk of developing blood vessel blockage while HDL above 50 mg% helps protect against the development of this problem.

High triglycerides also can affect a person’s health including development of pancreatic disease.  Any intervention – including lifestyle changes and medications –  that will improve the overall cholesterol readings will also improve the total TG.

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Interventions to improve the cholesterol numbers and reduce risk of cardiac disease:

  • Exercise – 30-45 minutes 3 times per week
  • Diet – increase fiber, reduce fat and sugar
  • Weight loss – even 5 pounds will affect the level
  • Medication – effective but comes with risk of side effects

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Blood sugar (Glucose)

Important in the proper functioning of most all body systems, if the blood level is too high, many of the major organs can be damaged irrevocably, most notably the heart, kidneys, circulatory system and eyes. Normally, people think of getting a blood sugar reading by having their finger lanced to obtain a drop of blood.  This “spot” reading will give an idea of current glucose level but the Hemoglobin A1c (Hgb A1c) is much better at allowing us to determine average blood sugar level over several weeks.

Without getting too scientific, the higher the average blood sugar, the higher the level of Hgb A1c.  In general we strive to get the level below 7%.

Ways to improve Hgb A1c :

  • Take your medications as prescribed
  • Prescribed exercise program
  • Improve diet and control your weight

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Body Mass Index

This number is determined by a patient’s height and weight.

The ideal BMI is between 18.5 and 25.  Below 18.5 is considered underweight with 25-30 being overweight.

Those individuals above 30 are classified obese.  The importance of BMI lies with the effects of stress on the heart, circulatory system, joints, muscles and metabolism.  Severe obesity with BMI greater than 36 increases the individual’s risk for hypertension, myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke, diabetes, degenerative arthritis, decreased independence.  Obviously we cannot affect the BMI by growing taller but anything we can do to reduce weight will improve the BMI.

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Blood Pressure

The measurement of blood pressure is important in determining the stress the heart experiences pumping the blood through the thousands (approximately 60K) of miles of blood vessels in the body. Like a body builder the heart, if faced with greater weight (pressure), will grow to meet the challenge.  But, also like the body builder, there can be too much growth (the heart becomes muscle bound) which results in the heart failing to “lift the weight”. The result is heart failure which many times causes permanent disability and death. 

We don’t have the time or space to discuss the effects of blood pressure on the kidneys,  but suffice it to say untreated blood pressure is a leading cause of kidney failure and need for dialysis.

Remember these numbers – Systolic 135, Diastolic 80. 

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If your readings fall above these numbers you should seriously consider speaking with your health care provider about intervention.

Interventions to improve blood pressure:

  • Reduce weight
  • Reduce alcohol intake
  • Reduce salt in the diet
  • Exercise with emphasis on aerobic activity
  • Adequate rest – sleep 6-8 hours/night
  • Stress reduction – yoga, meditation, therapeutic massage

Hopefully, this primer will help you manage your health with greater confidence and purpose.

Dr. Gatz and Dr. Rogers look forward to being your partner in wellness. To schedule an appointment, call the clinic at 504-962-6120. Visit www.umcno.org/primary-care to learn more about UMC’s Primary Care Center and its services.

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Colon Cancer: When & Why You Should Start Screening

Author: Guy Orangio, MD,  FACS, FASCRS, UMC Colorectal Cancer Surgeon

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Colorectal cancer is the fourth most commonly occurring cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, with over 56,000 people expected to die from this disease each year. However, this cancer is preventable and curable when detected and treated early.

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March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, a perfect time to learn more about  this disease and when and why to get screened. Because there are often no symptoms when it is first developing, colorectal cancer can only be caught early through regular screening.

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Most colon cancers start as non-cancerous growths called polyps. If we are able to find these polyps while they are still non-cancerous, we remove them and the cancer may be prevented. Major surgery can usually be avoided.

STAGES

Screening programs begin by classification of risk based on personal, family and medical history. People who are at increased risk may need earlier and more frequent screening depending upon the recommendation of their healthcare provider.

The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), which is dedicated to advancing the treatment of patients with diseases affecting the colon, rectum and anus, supports the following colorectal cancer screening guidelines:

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Recommendations Screening People at Average Risk

  • Men and women at average risk should have screening for colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps beginning at age 50 years.
  • A colonoscopy (a test that allows the physician to look directly at the lining of the entire colon and rectum) every 10 years or a barium enema (x-ray of the colon) every 5 to 10 years are acceptable alternatives. •

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Recommendations for Screening People at Increased Risk

  • People at increased risk of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps include those with first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) with colon cancer or adenomatous polyps diagnosed before 60 years
  • People with two first-degree relatives who were diagnosed at any age, should have screening colonoscopy starting at age 40 years — or ten years younger than the earliest diagnosis in their family — and then repeat every five years.
  • People with a first-degree relative with colon cancer or adenomatous polyp diagnosed at age greater than 60 years or two second degree relatives with colorectal cancer should be advised to be screened as average risk persons beginning at age 40 years
  • People with one second-degree relative (grandparent, aunt or uncle) or a third-degree relative (great-grandparent or cousin) with colorectal cancer should be screened as average risk persons

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Prevention Tips

In addition to timely and regular screening for colorectal cancer, people may be able to lower their risk of getting the disease by:

  • Avoiding foods that are high in fat.
  • Eating plenty of vegetables, fruits and other high-fiber foods.
  • Exercising regularly and maintaining a normal body weight.
  • Not smoking and drinking alcohol only in moderation.

 

For information on the Comprehensive Colorectal Cancer Program at UMC, click here.

 

About Dr. Orangio

Guy Orangio

Guy Orangio, MD, is a board-certified colorectal surgeon at UMC and an Association Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans.

 

Show Us Your Green!

Author: Rosetta Danigole, UMC Lead Clinical Dietitian, Nutritional Services

Green is everyone’s favorite color on St. Patrick’s Day. If you’re looking to liven up your party or dinner table, you’re in luck.  Nature has a bounty of options that don’t require food coloring.

Here are a few St. Paddy’s favorites from the UMC Nutrition team:

Brussels sprouts – These are packed with vitamins A and C as well as birth-defect fighting folate and blood pressure-balancing potassium. Not into Brussels sprouts or kale? Consider such other cruciferous veggies as broccoli, arugula, and bok choy.

Kale – A member of the powerhouse family of greens known as cruciferous veggies (a fancy word for the cabbage family), kale has bone-boosting vitamin K, vision- and immune-boosting vitamin A, and even anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

Asparagus – This springtime vegetable is rich in vitamins K, C, A, and folate. It also has a number of anti-inflammatory nutrients. Asparagus is also famous for a healthy dose of inulin — a “prebiotic” that promotes digestive health.

Edamame – These soybeans are a longtime Japanese diet staple. A complete plant-based protein, edamame is a good protein source for vegetarian and vegan diets. When eaten in place of fatty meat, soy may lower cholesterol by reducing saturated fat intake

Green Beans – Also called string beans, green beans are a common side dish in Southern cooking. They’re loaded with fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar, making them an excellent choice for people with diabetes.

Try these healthful green recipes:

Luck of the Irish Green Smoothie

This smoothie is full of iron, potassium and vitamins and taste like a yummy treat.

Ingredients:

1 cup fresh spinach

1 cup almond milk/coconut milk- low sugar

½ cup pineapple

½ cup mango- optional

1 banana

 

Instructions:

  1. Tightly pack spinach in a measuring cup.
  2. Add spinach to blender with milk alternative.  Blend together until all chunks are gone.
  3. Add pineapple, mango and banana.
  4. Blend all ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
  5. Serve cold with ice if desired.

 

Calories: 202

Sodium: 30 milligrams (very low)

Carbohydrate: 51 grams—all from natural sources—fruits and vegetables

Fiber: 6 grams

Protein: 3 grams

 

Collard Greens  

Collard greens not only taste good, they supply a good dose of fiber, calcium, protein and iron. To keep this Southern staple healthy, keep the sodium low and skip the meat.

Number of Servings: 8
Serving Size:  1 cup

 

Ingredients:

4 lb collard greens

3 cups low fat, low sodium chicken broth

2 chopped onions

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

1 tsp pepper

 

Instructions:

  1. Wash and cut the collard greens and place them in a large stockpot. Add the remaining ingredients and enough water to cover.
  2. Cook until tender, stirring occasionally, about 3 1/2 hours. The flavors will blend even more if you let the greens sit for a bit after cooking.