Pain Care: Prevention Before Treatment

Author: Harry J. Gould, III, MD, PhD

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When a patient says, “Doctor, it hurts when I do this,” the immediate thought in response to the implied request is “Don’t do that.”  Unfortunately, in today’s society, this seems to be the best and most effective advice that a physician can provide for their patients in pain.

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The United States is in the midst of what the Centers for Disease Control describes as “The worst public health crisis in American history.”

There are reports, almost daily, to enlighten us about the fact that the over-prescribing of prescription painkillers has led to countless overdose deaths and serious consequences associated with misuse, abuse, addiction, and diversion that plague society in epidemic proportions.

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As a result, there has been a strong push by the community and regulatory agencies to limit the prescribing and dispensing of opioid analgesics across the board, while paying little attention to the underlying cause.

Pain is often under-treated or over-treated, but mostly it is poorly treated.

The system’s response has precipitated a reluctance on the part of many physicians to provide pain care for many in need, further exacerbating the primary cause of the problem.

A frequent response is to change clinical focus and redirect efforts to offer one-dimensional assessment and management that relies on interventional modalities.  Unfortunately, not all patients are identical and interventions, if ordered inappropriately or too often, can be costly and have problems of their own.

The observations and policies have mandated change and have heightened the efforts of healthcare providers to find ways to “do no harm” in their efforts to help those in need.

How then can we improve pain care and overall quality of life?  Perhaps it is time to return to basics.

As a starting point, we should consider some important truths about pain.

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The Truth About Pain

  • Pain is subjective and is different for everyone based on culture, situation, experience, genetics, age and gender.
  • Pain is a modality that is essential for survival. It warns us of present and potential tissue injury so that we can respond and minimize damage.
  • The most important reason that chronic pain is so debilitating is less the uncomfortable sensation that is experienced and more the fact that pain robs us of our ability to control of own lives. Unfortunately, many chronic pain conditions are present for a lifetime.  Thus, the realistic goal should be to minimize the effect of the underlying condition causing the pain and reclaim control of our lives rather than to eliminate pain.

Too often, patients surrender responsibility for controlling their pain to friends, physicians, physicians, drugs or procedures.

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Taking Responsibility for Your Pain

As a patient, it is essential for you to take responsibility for your pain and to participate in your own care. This process can begin by considering and implementing some obvious positive behavior changes that can maximize pain control and minimize both physical and fiscal cost.

Things You Can Do to Control Pain

  • Eat a regular healthy diet, avoiding excess, with a goal to optimize body mass index (BMI).
  • Exercise daily — regular activity from baseline to 30-60 min/day tailored to the patient’s ability to tolerate activity without a backward slide. “No pain, no gain” is not always the best approach.
  • Be sure to get enough restorative sleep.
  • Balance life experiences and schedule time for yourself that allows for participation in hobbies and enjoyable leisure activities.
  • Be aware of habitual activities and positions that add undo ergonomic stress, e.g., poor posture, wearing high heels, wearing shoes that lack adequate support, sleeping on an old or non-supportive mattress or pillow, using inadequately supportive chairs and car seats. Tailor work and living environments to minimize but not necessarily eliminate stressors and eliminate high-risk conditions.
  • Learn and take advantage of alternative forms of coping and pain control, e.g., meditation, guided imagery, self-hypnosis and relaxation.

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With proper perspective and attention to basics, one is likely to realize improved general conditioning that enhances:

  • Healing and the immune system’s ability to fight off infection and disease
  • Improved cardiovascular, pulmonary and gastrointestinal health
  • Reduced stress
  • Improved mental health
  • Increased sense of self and well-being and an overall improved quality of life
  • Reduction in pain at any level

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When setbacks occur, first consider the use of topical heat, cooling or massage and prudent physical activity to improve strength, range of motion and endurance and seek counsel for a comprehensive pain assessment early when the basics have not provided adequate results.

Be a Good Sport: Tips for Preventing Youth Sports Injuries

Author: Patricia Clesi, RN, UMC Trauma Services Coordinator

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Youth participation in organized sports offers excellent benefits socially and physically, including reducing the risk of childhood obesity.

However, almost 1/3 of all injuries incurred in childhood are sports-related.

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In fact, high school athletes account for about 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A 2016 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said knee injuries, ankle sprains and concussions are among the most common outcomes in studies identifying risk factors for sports-related injuries. One study from the National Health Interview Survey even showed that sports, on average, account for 14 percent of all emergency department visits for life-threatening injuries, the majority of which (32%) come from those 18 and younger.

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Despite the scary statistics, more and more American children are participating in youth sports in recent years.

To make sure you or your child are not part of the numbers and prevent injury, consider these 5 simple, but potentially lifesaving, tips during this National Youth Sports Week:

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1. Warm Up

Time should always be set aside for warm up and stretching before playing sports. This will help prevent injury to muscles during play.  All major muscles groups should hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds.

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2. Gear Up

Appropriate and properly fitted sports gear should be used always. Helmets should be well maintained, age appropriate, and worn correctly.  There are no “concussion proof” helmets, however, it will help prevent skull fractures and traumatic brain injuries.

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3. Hydrate

Hydration before, during and after practice and games are very important to prevent dehydration, especially in the summer months.

Water is the best option to hydrate athletes.

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4. Rest

Overuse injuries are common, especially in youth playing on multiple teams of the same sport at the same time. Rest will help avoid these injuries.

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5. Report

Players should be encouraged to report any pain, injury or illness to their coaches and parents.

For more child safety tips, visit http://www.umcno.org/injuryprevention.

The Lasting Impact of Sudden Impact

Author: Natalie Moll, Student and Sudden Impact Graduate

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Driving is the first freedom teenagers often experience.

Unfortunately, motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teens.

When I was 16 years-old I had my first Sudden Impact experience, and since then, I have never viewed driving the same.

What is Sudden Impact?

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Sudden Impact is an interactive program that educates high school sophomores about the dangers of driving impaired, driving without a seat belt, and distracted driving. It is facilitated by the Injury Prevention Program for UMC’s Level 1 Trauma Center and by the Louisiana State Police.

The program also offers mock crashes and mock trials to further educate teenagers on the consequences of reckless driving. It has a big reach. Since the program’s inception 20 years ago, it has been expanded to 16 additional hospital host sites in 9 regions of Louisiana. It is in more than 120 schools.

The Presentation

On day one of Sudden Impact, we were presented a slide show filled with information on the risks of driving without seat belts and driving impaired (at the time, distracted driving wasn’t a large part of the program).

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I remember we took an anonymous test before the start of the presentation that asked questions such as:

  • How often do you wear your seat belt?
  • Would you or have you gotten behind the wheel after having a drink?

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Then, we heard from three speakers — a woman from the Trauma Prevention Team, a state trooper, and a woman who had been injured because of a drunk driver — that really ingrained three lessons I still think of when I get behind the wheel:

  1. Sometimes bad things happen to good people.
  2. 100 percent of crashes are preventable.
  3. Seat belts save lives.

Following our three speakers, we took an anonymous post-test that asked the same questions as the previous one. However, when compared to the pre-test, we noticed a 22% increase in responses that aligned with safer driving habits.

For example, one of the questions asked: How often will you wear a seat belt while in a car? During the pre-test, only 64% of students answered “always,” but for the post-test, 97% of students answered “always.”

The Mock Crash

About a year later, I had my second Sudden Impact experience. It was the mock car crash, which stressed the consequences of motor vehicle crashes as a result of impaired driving, distracted driving, and not using seat belts…along with everything that happens next — EMS arrival, the trip to the hospital, the family being notified…the list goes on. While the presentation I went through the year before was eye-opening, the only way to describe the mock crash is INTENSE.

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Sudden Impact set up a crash in our faculty parking lot in the morning, and while I knew there was going to be an assembly, I never thought I would have to witness girls I knew hanging out of cars screaming in agony. Although it’s all fake, it’s chilling how real it feels. Watching a classmate being loaded into a coroner’s van while her mother is crying is an image that will forever with me. It reminded me that I have to make the conscious decision to think about the consequences of my actions, especially when driving.

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The Injury Prevention Team also returns to some schools three years after the first presentation for an anonymous survey for high school seniors that asks about the effectiveness of the overall program.

97% of the seniors said they felt that Sudden Impact kept them from driving impaired, driving distracted and not using their seat belts as well as practicing safer driving habits.

The Impact

I’m a college junior now, and I practice safer habits when I’m driving or riding in a car because of the Sudden Impact program. It gave me a true perspective of the dangers that come with driving. I think it was important that I learned the risks of reckless driving the same time I was learning the rules of the road, and it was important for me to hear it from those three speakers. I paid more attention to the things they were saying because they were the ones saying it.

Now, I never get in a car without using the seat belt or while impaired, and I never have to remind my friends who went through the program with me to do the same. It’s because we all understand the consequences of our potential actions…and that may not be the case had we not experienced Sudden Impact.

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Remember: 100% of all motor vehicle crashes are preventable. Drive safely, and remember the impact you have while on the road.

 

About the Author: Natalie Moll

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Natalie Moll is a junior at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. She is majoring in mass communication with a concentration in public relations and a minor in sociology. Natalie is also a founding member of the Omega chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, where she serves as Sisterhood Chair.

Tobacco and Heart Disease

Author: Johnny d’Aquin MS, RRT, RPFT, UMC Pulmonary Services Director 

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May 31, 2018 is World No Tobacco Day, an annual program of the World Health Organization, and I can’t think of a better day than that one to quit smoking.

The focus of World No Tobacco Day 2018 is “Tobacco and heart disease.” The goal is to raise awareness on the link between tobacco, and heart and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including stroke, which combined are the world’s leading causes of death.

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The Truth About Tobacco and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease

The American Heart Association (AHA) says diseases caused by smoking kill more than 440,000 people in the U.S. each year.  Smoking puts people at high risk of lung disease, including lung cancer and emphysema. Smokers also have increased risk for heart disease and stroke.

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Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) kill more people than any other cause of death worldwide, and tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure contribute to approximately 12% of all heart disease deaths.

  • One out of every 5 smoking-related deaths is caused by heart disease.
  • Women older than 35 who smoke and take birth control pills are at much greater risk for heart disease or stroke.
  • Cigarette smokers are 2 to 4 times more likely to get heart disease than nonsmokers.
  • Cigarette smoking doubles a person’s risk for stroke.

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How Does Smoking Change the Heart and Blood Vessels?

Smoking:

  • Causes an instant and long-term rise in blood pressure.
  • Causes an instant and long-term increase in heart rate.
  • Reduces blood flow from the heart.
  • Reduces the amount of oxygen that reaches the body’s tissues.
  • Increases risk for blood clots.
  • Damages blood vessels.
  • Doubles the risk of stroke (reduced blood flow to the brain).

Smoking has also been linked with depression and stress.

The good news is that quitting smoking can reduce the risk of heart disease.

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According to the AHA, stopping smoking reduces the risk for heart disease, the risk for repeat heart attacks, and death by heart disease by half.

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UMC is partnering with the Smoking Cessation Trust to help people quit smoking.

If you smoked just one cigarette before September 1, 1988 and are a current Louisiana resident, you are eligible to register with the smoking cessation trust and get free help.

You can get free smoking cessation medications, doctor visits, quit-line coaching and counseling. Call our office at (504) 702-4636 or enroll online.

Why Wait Another Day?

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Eyes on the Road: The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Author: Bridget Gardner, Injury Prevention Coordinator

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Have you ever been on a cell phone and passed your exit? Have you reached for an item in your vehicle or taken your eyes of the road just for a second, only to find yourself swerving to avoid the car ahead?

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When you are in your car, a moment’s distraction can easily have more devastating consequences.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 9% of the fatal crashes in the U.S. were caused by distracted driving and 3,450 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.

Distractions aren’t just cell phones. Distracted driving is any activity that diverts your attention away from the primary task of driving.

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Distractions include adjusting a radio, GPS or MP3 player, texting, talking on a cell phone, updating social media, selecting a song list, talking to passengers, eating, drinking, grooming, like shaving or applying makeup, reading, and diverting your attention to crashes and billboards.

If you remove your eyes off the road for 4.6 seconds, at 55 mph, you will drive the length of a football field.  So, you’re basically driving blindfolded for the length of the football field. This not only places you at risk, it places every driver on the road at risk.

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Cell phones are a primary distraction, because it involves three types of distraction simultaneously:

  • Visual (taking your eyes off the road)
  • Manual (taking your hands off the wheel), and
  • Cognitive (taking your mind off driving).

In the fractions of a second in which you need to identify a danger, process the decision, react and respond to the hazard, there isn’t enough time when you do not remain focused or your attention isn’t on driving.

Forty-four states, including Louisiana, ban text messaging for all drivers. Fourteen states prohibit hand-held cell phone use by drivers.

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Currently, Louisiana has a bill to propose the use of hands free devices only for drivers.

University Medical Center, which is home to the region’s only Level I Trauma Center, has a strong commitment to the prevention of injuries due to distracted driving. The Trauma Center’s Injury Prevention Team is committed to decreasing the risk of injury through programs such as Sudden Impact.

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Twice per week, high school sophomores attend the hospital-based program to understand the real consequences to such high-risk behavior. Helping them understand the risks of distracted driving is essential – after all, 76% of participants state that they have been in a crash or near crash because the driver of the vehicle was distracted.

Distracted driving is also written into the script for the Sudden Impact Mock Crash, “Consequences of Impact” and the Mock Trial, “Lifetime of Consequences.”

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We encourage you to not be the next victim.

Reduce cell phone distractions

If there is an option to turn your phone off or send automatic replies to texts while driving, this is highly recommended.

It can wait

Most conversations and texts can wait and if they cannot, pull to a safe, well-lit area to return the call or text.

Safety first

Be a role model to the passengers in your vehicle. If you have a call or text that needs to be returned, have a passenger return the call or text for you.

Eyes on the road

Keep your eyes on the road and always be aware of your surroundings.

Drive defensively

Be ready to avoid a crash by driving defensively.

Remember, crashes are PREVENTABLE.

Know Your Numbers

Authors: Alan Gatz, MD and Kendria Holt-Rogers, MD, UMC Primary Care Physicians

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Today,  many people are aware of the need to focus on the effect of risk factors and life choices on overall health and wellness. Health professionals speak to patients about cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, BMI (body-mass index), and hemoglobin A1c, but many individuals become overwhelmed and do not totally understand all of the information as presented.

Here’s a condensed and simplified description of the above mentioned health determinants.

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Cholesterol

This term actually should be changed to lipids, which includes the entire family of proteins sub-divided into three major subcategories:

  1. LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol
  2. HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and
  3. Triglycerides (TG).

The two numbers the majority of people need to remember are their LDL and HDL levels.

A simple way to understand the concept of reducing heart and vascular disease is to keep the low low and the high high. LDL level above 150 mg% increases the risk of developing blood vessel blockage while HDL above 50 mg% helps protect against the development of this problem.

High triglycerides also can affect a person’s health including development of pancreatic disease.  Any intervention – including lifestyle changes and medications –  that will improve the overall cholesterol readings will also improve the total TG.

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Interventions to improve the cholesterol numbers and reduce risk of cardiac disease:

  • Exercise – 30-45 minutes 3 times per week
  • Diet – increase fiber, reduce fat and sugar
  • Weight loss – even 5 pounds will affect the level
  • Medication – effective but comes with risk of side effects

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Blood sugar (Glucose)

Important in the proper functioning of most all body systems, if the blood level is too high, many of the major organs can be damaged irrevocably, most notably the heart, kidneys, circulatory system and eyes. Normally, people think of getting a blood sugar reading by having their finger lanced to obtain a drop of blood.  This “spot” reading will give an idea of current glucose level but the Hemoglobin A1c (Hgb A1c) is much better at allowing us to determine average blood sugar level over several weeks.

Without getting too scientific, the higher the average blood sugar, the higher the level of Hgb A1c.  In general we strive to get the level below 7%.

Ways to improve Hgb A1c :

  • Take your medications as prescribed
  • Prescribed exercise program
  • Improve diet and control your weight

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Body Mass Index

This number is determined by a patient’s height and weight.

The ideal BMI is between 18.5 and 25.  Below 18.5 is considered underweight with 25-30 being overweight.

Those individuals above 30 are classified obese.  The importance of BMI lies with the effects of stress on the heart, circulatory system, joints, muscles and metabolism.  Severe obesity with BMI greater than 36 increases the individual’s risk for hypertension, myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke, diabetes, degenerative arthritis, decreased independence.  Obviously we cannot affect the BMI by growing taller but anything we can do to reduce weight will improve the BMI.

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Blood Pressure

The measurement of blood pressure is important in determining the stress the heart experiences pumping the blood through the thousands (approximately 60K) of miles of blood vessels in the body. Like a body builder the heart, if faced with greater weight (pressure), will grow to meet the challenge.  But, also like the body builder, there can be too much growth (the heart becomes muscle bound) which results in the heart failing to “lift the weight”. The result is heart failure which many times causes permanent disability and death. 

We don’t have the time or space to discuss the effects of blood pressure on the kidneys,  but suffice it to say untreated blood pressure is a leading cause of kidney failure and need for dialysis.

Remember these numbers – Systolic 135, Diastolic 80. 

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If your readings fall above these numbers you should seriously consider speaking with your health care provider about intervention.

Interventions to improve blood pressure:

  • Reduce weight
  • Reduce alcohol intake
  • Reduce salt in the diet
  • Exercise with emphasis on aerobic activity
  • Adequate rest – sleep 6-8 hours/night
  • Stress reduction – yoga, meditation, therapeutic massage

Hopefully, this primer will help you manage your health with greater confidence and purpose.

Dr. Gatz and Dr. Rogers look forward to being your partner in wellness. To schedule an appointment, call the clinic at 504-962-6120. Visit www.umcno.org/primary-care to learn more about UMC’s Primary Care Center and its services.

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Out With the Old: Why It’s Important for Seniors to Get Moving

Author: Maryann Vicari, UMC Physical Therapist

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How do we age well and gracefully? This question has been on the mind of human beings for ages. We have all been searching, to some extent, for the fountain of youth or a way to slow down the aging process. Unfortunately, that fountain has yet to be discovered, and no scientist has come up with a formula that will keep time from aging the body.

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Nevertheless, there is some good news. We, as humans, can improve our aging process and increase the number of “healthy” years by doing something that humans have been doing for centuries – MOVE! That’s right, moving the body is one of the best ways to age well and to help reduce the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and obesity, which are a few of the main causes of death and poor aging among older adults.

Evidence has shown that regular physical activity is safe for healthy and even frail older adults (ages 65 and older). 

This physical activity can range from low intensity walking to more vigorous sports and resistance exercises, depending on the individual’s preference and physical ability.  Basically, for older adults, some form of physical activity is better than nothing at all or a predominantly sedentary lifestyle.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), older adults need at least 2.5 hours of moderate intensity aerobic activity (think brisk walking) every week, which is about 30 minutes a day, and muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hip, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

This may sound like a lot, but please do not be discouraged; you don’t have to start here.  If you have never worked out before or have been inactive for some time, you can safely work your way up to this point by joining a local wellness center or YMCA.  There, you can find trained professionals that can help you work towards your goal of achieving a healthy and physically active lifestyle.  As always, you should consult your physician before beginning any sort of exercise routine, especially if this is new to you or if you have a pre-existing heart or metabolic disease, such as diabetes and hypertension.

To make an appointment for a consultation with one of our primary care physicians, click here.

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Keep this in mind: If you want to improve your health or if you want to maintain the level of health you have for years to come, your best bet is get or stay as active as you can.  The more active you are as you age the less likely you will be to develop debilitating diseases, which can only work as catalysts to age you beyond your years.

So, get out there and move your bones!

 

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/older_adults/index.htm

McPhee, J., et al.  Physical activity in older age: perspectives for healthy aging and frailty.  Biogerontology. (2016). 17: 567 – 580.

Safe and…Sound: Tips for Voice Conservation During Mardi Gras

Author: Kevin Hemenger, UMC Speech Pathologist

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Most of us take our voice for granted—it’s there when we need it, and we don’t think much about it. But when your voice isn’t working right, it can cause serious problems, like one of these vocal disorders. It is important to take care of your vocal health just like you take care of other aspects of your health.

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You have two vocal cords located in your throat a little below the jawline (behind the Adam’s apple in men). The vocal cords are made of very delicate tissue that vibrates to produce voice. They stretch and contract at the same time to produce all of the different sounds and pitches that we use while talking and singing.

If the vocal cords are overused, they can become inflamed and swollen, so they don’t vibrate as well, causing the voice to sound hoarse. With repeated or frequent overuse, the vocal cords can be injured. Depending on the injury, this can require speech therapy or surgery.

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It’s easy to get carried away at parades, sporting events, concerts, and other festive occasions and overuse your voice. In these situations, you should avoid yelling above your typical conversational level.

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Tips for Saving Your Voice

  • Try clapping, waving, or whistling instead.
  • A “noisemaker” is also a good way to express your excitement.
  • If you know someone riding in a parade, make a sign to get their attention—it’s easier for the rider to spot you that way too!

It’s important to drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids. 

Your vocal cords are very susceptible to dehydration. Be sure to have water or juice with you on the parade route and drink plenty of these throughout the day.

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If you do overuse your voice and find that you are hoarse the next day, rest your voice as much as possible and drink plenty of fluids. Typically, a one-time voice overuse will take care of itself in a couple of days.

If your voice is hoarse for more than a month with no improvement, then you should consider making an appointment with an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) physician, who will take a look at your vocal cords and may refer you to Speech Therapy.

To make an appointment with an ENT at UMC, please call (504) 702-5700. Our ENT Clinic is located on the 3rd floor of the Ambulatory Care Building (ACB) in Zone C.

Stay safe and SOUND this Mardi Gras Season!

The ABC’s of Antibiotics

Author: Jennifer Lambert, PharmD, MPA, UMCNO Clinical Pharmacist

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What are Antibiotics?

Antibiotics are types of medicine that help stop infections caused by bacteria. How they do this is by (1) killing the bacteria or (2) keeping the bacteria from reproducing.

The word antibiotic, itself, means “against life.”

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Did You Know?

An estimated 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths occur each year in the US due to antibiotic resistant infections.1 Antibiotics are drugs used to treat bacterial infections, not viral infections. Using antibiotics the wrong way can lead to antibiotic-resistant infections that cause illness or death. This is why healthcare providers are being more careful when prescribing antibiotics.

  • When not used correctly, antibiotics can be harmful to your health.
  • Antibiotics can cure most bacterial infections. Antibiotics cannot cure viral illnesses.
  • Antibiotics cause one out of five Emergency Department visits for drug-related side effects.
  • It is estimated that more than half of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed.1
  • Antibiotics can lead to severe forms of diarrhea that can be life- threatening, especially in elderly patients.
  • When you are sick, antibiotics are not always the answer

Antibiotics: The Alphabet Letter by Letter

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A (Ask)

  • “Are these antibiotics necessary?” and “What can I do to feel better?”

B (Bacteria)

  • Antibiotics do not kill viruses. They only kill bacteria.

C (Complete the Course)

  • Take all of your antibiotics exactly as prescribed (even if you are feeling better).

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How Can You Help Prevent Antibiotic Resistance?

  • Take antibiotics exactly as your healthcare provider instructs.
  • Only take antibiotics prescribed for you.
  • Do not save antibiotics for the next illness or share them with others.
  • Do not pressure your healthcare provider for antibiotics.

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Do You Need an Antibiotic?

Illness Virus Bacteria
Colds NO
Flu NO
Whooping cough YES
Strep throat YES
Most ear aches NO
Bronchitis NO
Pneumonia YES

What Can You Do to Help Yourself Feel Better if You Have a Viral Illness?

Pain relievers, fever reducers, decongestants, saline nasal spray or drops, warm compresses, liquids, and rest may be the best things to help you feel better. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist what symptom relief is best for you.

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Prescriptions for antibiotics can be filled and picked up at the Walgreens Pharmacy at UMC.

 

If you are in need of a healthcare provider, click here.

 

Citations:

1 CDC. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013. 16 September 2013. 32.

Why You Won’t Want to “Feel the Burn” This New Year’s

Author: Angelle Bonura, BSN, RN, Nursing Director of UMC Burn Center

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Sparks fly every New Year’s Eve, and I don’t just mean romance during the annual midnight kiss. Fireworks are the staple tradition for ringing in the New Year, and for 2018, it will be no different.

While fireworks are fun to enjoy, they also pose hazards to those using or near them. On average, 250 people report to the emergency department every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month of July around Independence Day, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. For New Year’s, that number historically spikes again.

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In total, more than 50 percent of injuries involving fireworks happen to people under the age of 20.

At the UMC Burn Center, it is our job not only to treat and care for those who have suffered burn injuries, but to prevent them from happening in the first place.

Here are the do’s and don’ts when it comes to popping fireworks this year, compliments of the American Burn Association:

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DO

  • Consider safe alternatives, such as glow sticks and confetti poppers
  • Follow your local and state laws regarding fireworks
  • Have a designated SOBER adult light all fireworks
  • Light one firework at a time and move away quickly
  • Keep children and other observers at a safe distance
  • Keep a bucket of water close for disposal of fireworks

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DON’T

  • Allow children to handle fireworks
  • Attempt to alter, modify or relight fireworks
  • Point or throw lit fireworks at anyone
  • Ever hold lit fireworks in your hand
  • Consume alcohol or drugs when lighting fireworks

THE FACTS

  • Sparklers can reach 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Thousands of fireworks injuries were treated in the U.S. emergency rooms, often leaving permanent damage.

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IF A BURN INJURY DOES HAPPEN…

  • Cool the burn with COOL water.
  • Remove all clothing and jewelry from the burned area.
  • Cover the area with a dry clean sheet or loose bandages.
  • Seek medical attention immediately.

The UMC Burn Center will open in early 2018. It will be the only combined Burn-Trauma Center from Houston to Mobile, and will comprehensively treat thermal, inhalation and chemical burns.

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To learn more about the new Burn Center, visit: www.umcno.org/burncenter or click here.

To learn more about our Level 1 Trauma Center, visit: www.umcno.org/trauma.