Essential Immunizations for Adults

GettyImages-669938250.jpg

You want to pass on certain things like family traditions, a grandmother’s quilt or dad’s love of books—but no one wants to pass on a serious illness. Take charge of your health and help protect those around you by asking about vaccines at your next doctor’s visit.

GettyImages-863504394.jpg

Vaccines

Vaccinating our children is commonplace in the United States. But many adults don’t know which vaccines they need, and even fewer are fully vaccinated. Every year, thousands of adults in the U.S. become needlessly ill from infectious diseases. Many adults are hospitalized and some even die from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines.

Not only can vaccine-preventable diseases make you very sick, but if you get sick, you may risk spreading certain diseases to others. That’s a risk most of us do not want to take.

GettyImages-951541842.jpg

Babies, older adults and people with weakened immune systems (like those undergoing cancer treatment) are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases. They are also more likely to have severe illness and complications if they do get sick.

You can help protect your health and the health of your loved ones by getting your recommended vaccines.

GettyImages-693058384.jpg

The good news is that getting vaccinated is easier than you think. Adults can get vaccinated at their primary care doctor’s office, pharmacies, workplaces, health clinics and health departments.

Most health insurance plans cover the cost of recommended vaccines—a call to your insurance provider can give you the details.

GettyImages-650006104.jpg

What vaccines do you need?

All adults should get:

  • Annual flu vaccine to protect against seasonal flu
  • Td/Tdap to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough)

Some additional vaccines you may need (depending on your age, health conditions and other factors) include:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Meningococcal
  • Pneumococcal
  • Shingles

GettyImages-846489690.jpg

Traveling overseas?

There may be additional vaccines you need depending on the location. Find out here. 

GettyImages-519833420.jpg

Still not sure what vaccines you may need?

Take this short quiz.

Summertime Skincare

Author: Brian D. Lee, MD, UMC Dermatologist and Kelly R. Stewart Chairman of the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Department of Dermatology

GettyImages-950778134.jpg
The warmth of summer sunshine draws many people outdoors to participate in a variety of activities during these beautiful days.

It’s important to protect your skin from the damaging potential of sunlight.

This article focuses on the simple steps necessary to avoid sun damage and maximize your fun in the sun.

The Truth about Tanning

GettyImages-78461169.jpg
First thing’s first: There is no such thing as a healthy tan. Tanned skin is simply an indication of damaged skin. People who tan dramatically increase their risk of developing skin cancer and destroying the elasticity of the skin, causing sagging, leather-like skin that will make them look much older than their actual age.

GettyImages-838282218 (1).jpg

Artificial sun tanners afford no protection against the harmful rays of the sun and may give one a false sense of protection. People with dark skin need to wear sunblocks because their darker natural skin color does not afford them enough protection.

The Damaging Effects of the Sun

GettyImages-984020088.jpg
The damaging effects of the sun includes the induction of:

  • Skin cancers
  • Premature aged appearance
  • Sun induced eye diseases including eye cancers, and increased risk of cataracts and glaucoma.

Protecting Yourself and Your Children

To protect oneself from the sun, sunblocks, sunglasses, and sun protective clothing must be used.

GettyImages-679896548.jpg

Children less than 6 months of age should not use sun blocks because of concerns regarding their absorption of the sunblock ingredients. They should wear loose fitting, long sleeve shirts and pants, wear a hat of tightly knit material (when held up to light there should be darkness inside cap) and sunglasses where are labelled to protect against the two types of sun rays: UVA and UVB.

GettyImages-804253762.jpg
Everyone should limit their outdoor exposure between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. Shade areas may contain 80% of non-shaded areas. It is best to be inside at the peak sunlight intensity hours.

Sunscreen

GettyImages-986665996.jpg

Sunblock should be of a SPF of 30 or greater and the container should also indicate 100% blockage of UVA sunlight.

One ounce of sunblock (a small jigger) is necessary to rub into the skin 20 to 30 minutes prior to sun exposure to allow sunblock absorption. Spray sunblocks should be sprayed onto the hands and rubbed into the skin to avoid eye exposure.

GettyImages-853808618.jpg
There are two types of sun blocks: physical and chemical. Physical sun blocks contain zinc oxide and titanium dioxide and protect by causing reflection the harmful rays. These are excellent products which eliminate the risk of allergic reactions to ingredients in chemical sun blocks. They are available in lotions, gels and sprays.  Most sun blocks sold are chemical sun blocks.

While the potential for allergic reaction (rashes/itching) is very rare, the possibility exists. When shopping for chemical sunblocks read the ingredient label and look for a product that contains avobenzone and does not contain oxybenzone. Oxybenzone may have a possible link to the production of hormone imbalances (low testosterone). Clear spray sunblocks are favorites of men for applying to their skin. Perspiration, degradation and swimming eliminate the sunblocks, so application every 2 hours is recommended.

Grab your sunblock, sun glasses and a hat and have a wonderful day at the beach!

Sun-Safety-Tips_Infographic.jpg