Drink, Be Merry, But Be Very Careful!

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It’s common for adults to enjoy a glass of wine, beer or eggnog with their meals during the holiday season; but no matter the time of year, it’s always important that you don’t overdo it, especially as an older adult.

As you age, you become more sensitive to alcohol’s effects. After age 65, your lean body mass and water content decrease, and your metabolism slows down. This means that alcohol stays in your system longer, making the amount of alcohol in your blood higher than it would have been when you were younger.

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Even without the influence of alcohol, older adults are more likely to have hearing and vision problems and slower reaction times. This puts them at higher risk for falls, fractures, and automobile accidents, and that risk only increases when tied to drinking.

Some medical conditions in people older than age 65, and the medicines used to treat them, can worsen with alcohol’s effects, including diabetes, high blood pressure, and ulcers.

Medicines taken by older adults, as compared to those taken by younger folks, are more likely to have serious interactions with alcohol and drugs according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The same holds true even if they’re not taken at the same time. Why? Because the drug may still be in your blood when you have a drink.

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Heavy alcohol use—at any age— can lead to other health problems.

So, what’s a safe amount?

The NIAAA recommends that people older than age 65 who are healthy and do not take any medicines, have no more than 7 drinks a week, an average of 1 standard drink each day and no more than 3 drinks on any 1 day. One drink is 12 ounces of beer, ale, or wine cooler; 8 ounces of malt liquor; 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of distilled liquor.

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How to Cut Down

If you want to limit your drinking starting with this holiday season, try these steps from the National Institutes of Health:

  1. Write down your reasons for cutting back. These might include wanting to improve your health or sleep better. Other reasons may be to improve relationships and to stay independent.
  2. Track your drinking habits for at least 1 week. Write down when and how much you drink every day.
  3. Set a drinking goal. You may decide to cut down to 1 drink a day or not to drink at all. Write your goal on a piece of paper and put it where you will see it every day.

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As they say, “Eat, drink and be merry!” But most importantly, be smart and be careful when consuming alcohol.

Season’s Grievings

Author: Sonia Malhotra, MD, MS, FAAP, and Director of Palliative Medicine and Supportive Care at University Medical Center New Orleans

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The Holiday Season is one full of celebration, joy and gathering for so many.  But for many individuals, especially those living with a serious illness, the Holiday Season can seem like more of a burden than a joy. Coordinating appointments, making sure there are enough supplies to last through days when pharmacies and stores are closed, and contacting healthcare providers are only some of the challenges those living with a serious illness have to face.

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Additionally, the Holidays often bring about stressors, anxiety and grief over the inability to travel and the loss of other abilities, the diagnosis of a serious illness, and often the loss of loved ones.

Palliative Medicine is the interdisciplinary care of patients with serious illness such as cancer, blood disorders, heart disease, neurologic disease, liver and kidney disease and advanced lung disease to name a few.

It provides this level of care in 4 areas:

  1. Pain and Symptom Management, including managing symptoms that affect the quality of life
  2. Communication about Healthcare Decisions, Plans of Care and Coordination of Care
  3. Emotional & Spiritual Support for Patients and their Caretakers
  4. Hospice, End-of-Life Decision Making and Support, and Bereavement Services

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November marked the celebration of National Hospice & Palliative Medicine month. 

However, each month in the life of our patients LIVING with serious illness brings awareness of the challenges and struggles we need to celebrate. Serious illness and Palliative Medicine are NOT about end-of-life care. Rather, Palliative Medicine and its care of the seriously ill focuses on finding ways to ensure that our patients and their caretakers are LIVING with the best quality of life they possibly can.2017-NationalHospiceMonth_Logo

So how can patients and their families survive this Holiday season with a Serious Illness?

  1. Establish Priorities: Choose the Holiday traditions and activities that have the most meaning to you. Create and prioritize activities based on your state of mind and energy level.
  2. Depend on Loved Ones to Fill In: This can be especially tough for those who like to do things independently. However, it is important to be realistic about what you will have energy to do. Ask for assistance, take assistance when it is given and be clear about your own limits.
  3. Plan Ahead: This is especially important if you have dietary restrictions while undergoing treatments. Talk to your healthcare team about rescheduling treatments that may leave you feeling under-energized during important family gatherings or traditions.
  4. Be Selective with Your Time: Do things and be with the people who energize you, not those who deplete you. Don’t feel the pressure to fulfill obligations, do the things that matter the most
  5. Acknowledge and Share Your Feelings: It is okay to feel sad, anxious and even angry. Give yourself the permission to have these feelings and share them with trusted loved ones and healthcare professionals. Use support groups and online communities as often or as little as you need.

The Holidays can be a stressful time for those living with a serious illness and those caring for a loved one with a serious illness. Keep in mind that nurturing yourself and allowing others to nurture you will help in the celebration and reflection of these times.

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