Simple Stretches for those Stretched Too Thin

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Stretching is an important part of every workout, but it also has benefits beyond the gym. Stretching improves flexibility, helps maintain a good range of motion in your joints and also relieves stress. Stretching can be done at home, work or on the go. Here are some simple stretching exercises for busy people.

Remember to listen to your body as you stretch and stop if you feel pain of any kind.

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Wrists

Reach your arms out in front of you. Rotate your wrists 10 times in a clockwise direction, then 10 times counterclockwise.

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Arms and Hands

Clasp your hands together in front of your chest at shoulder height. Extend your arms forward until you feel a stretch in your upper back, shoulders, arms, and hands. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat for 30 seconds.

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Arms

Lift one arm in front of you as if to grab something. Then use the other arm to pull the outstretched arm gently across the chest so that the muscles are stretched. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat for another 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat, using your left arm.

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Neck

Close your eyes. Drop your ear to your shoulder and hold for 15 seconds. Roll your chin across your chest to the other shoulder and hold for 15 seconds. Repeat.

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Overhead Reach

Inhale slowly and deeply. Raise arms overhead. Exhale completely and release. Repeat.

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Chest

Bring your arms behind your back and link your fingers with your palms facing inward. Straighten your arms and lift them up until you feel a stretch in your arms, shoulders, and chest. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat the stretch for another 15 to 30 seconds.

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Back

Sit tall in your chair and try to turn to grab the back of the chair while keeping your feet flat on the floor. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat the stretch turning to the other side.

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Hips

Cross one ankle onto the opposite knee and sit tall. Then, lean forward from your hips, keeping your chest upright. This stretches the outer hip, which is the reason for many back problems. Hold for 15 seconds and relax. Repeat using the other leg.

A Healthy Plate is a Happy Plate: 20 Ways to Enjoy More Fruits & Veggies

Author: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists

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Building a healthy plate is easy when you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. It’s also a great way to add color, flavor and texture plus vitamins, minerals and fiber. All this is packed in fruits and vegetables that are low in calories and fat. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables your daily goal.

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Try the following tips to enjoy more fruits and vegetables every day:

  1. Variety abounds when using vegetables as pizza topping. Try broccoli, spinach, green peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms and zucchini.
  2. Mix up a breakfast smoothie made with low-fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana.iStock-485076210.jpg
  3. Make a veggie wrap with roasted vegetables and low-fat cheese rolled in a whole-wheat tortilla.
  4. Try crunchy vegetables instead of chips with your favorite low-fat salad dressing for dipping.
  5. Grill colorful vegetable kabobs packed with tomatoes, green and red peppers, mushrooms and onions.
  6. Add color to salads with baby carrots, grape tomatoes, spinach leaves or mandarin oranges.*
  7. Keep cut vegetables handy for mid-afternoon snacks, side dishes, lunch box additions or a quick nibble while waiting for dinner. Ready-to-eat favorites: red, green or yellow peppers, broccoli or cauliflower florets, carrots, celery sticks, cucumbers, snap peas or whole radishes.
  8. Place colorful fruit where everyone can easily grab something for a snack-on-the- run. Keep a bowl of fresh, just ripe whole fruit in the center of your kitchen or dining table.iStock-832079576.jpg
  9. Get saucy with fruit. Puree apples, berries, peaches or pears in a blender for a thick, sweet sauce on grilled or broiled seafood or poultry, or on pancakes, French toast or waffles.
  10. Stuff an omelet with vegetables. Turn any omelet into a hearty meal with broccoli, squash, carrots, peppers, tomatoes or onions with low-fat sharp cheddar cheese.
  11. “Sandwich” in fruits and vegetables. Add pizzazz to sandwiches with sliced pineapple, apple, peppers, cucumber and tomato as fillings.
  12. Wake up to fruit. Make a habit of adding fruit to your morning oatmeal, ready-to-eat cereal, yogurt or toaster waffle.
  13. Top a baked potato with beans and salsa or broccoli and with low-fat cheese.iStock-140256741.jpg
  14. Microwave a cup of vegetable soup as a snack or with a sandwich for lunch.
  15. Add grated, shredded or chopped vegetables such as zucchini, spinach and carrots to lasagna, meatloaf, mashed potatoes, pasta sauce and rice dishes.
  16. Make fruit your dessert: Slice a  banana lengthwise and top with a scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt. Sprinkle with a tablespoon of chopped nuts.
  17. Stock your freezer with frozen vegetables to steam or stir-fry for a quick side dish.iStock-530627641.jpg
  18. Make your main dish a salad of dark, leafy greens and other colorful vegetables. Add chickpeas or edamame (fresh soybeans). Top with low-fat dressing.*
  19. Fruit on the grill: Make kabobs with pineapple, peaches and banana. Grill on low heat until fruit is hot and slightly golden.
  20. Dip: Whole wheat pita wedges in hummus, baked tortilla chips in salsa, strawberries or apple slices in low-fat yogurt, or graham crackers in applesauce.

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*See “Color Your Plate with Salad” at www.eatright.org/nutritiontipsheets for more tips on creating healthy salads

For a nutrition consultation with our dietitians, please call (504) 702-5700 to schedule an appointment.

 

 

To learn more about healthy lifestyle choices, visit our new Primary Care Center at 2003 Tulane Avenue or www.umcno.org/primary-care.

 

 

For information about the UMCNO Cancer Kitchen, which happens every other month at Simplee Gourmet, email Laura Kerns or call her at (504) 702-3691.

 

 

 

A Resolution for a Revolution: How to Stay True to Your New Year’s Goals

 

Author: Alan Gatz, MD, UMC Primary Care Physician

Most people have good intentions when making a resolution, but oftentimes, they set themselves up for failure by setting unrealistic goals or not being fully invested in the proposition.

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For example:  “I resolve to transform this overweight, middle-aged couch potato into the new and improved Adonis 2.0.” Okay, you caught me. This has been my standard resolution for the past two decades. After 20+  years, I have yet to achieve this unrealistic, yet admirable result. If I had to guess, I would say that most who read this post have made similar nebulous resolutions.

Well, what’s past is past: I’m vowing to make 2018 different.

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Rather than talking the talk, I’m endeavoring to walk the walk — and you should, too! The days of written vows that never live to see the light of day should be rendered passé. Instead, we should take oaths that describe defined, attainable goals supported by specific actions to reach those goals.

Only in doing that can we measure our success — because we’ll actually have metrics. This tangible action will improve our success significantly by serving as a physical reminder and reinforcement of our commitment.

With that in mind, I present to you my personal oath for 2018.

I vow to take charge of my health and well-being by:

  • Establishing a relationship with a primary care physician
  • Exercising at least 3 times per week for 45 to 60 minutes
  • Developing healthy eating habits and limiting consumption of fast food
  • Working with my physician, dietitian, and exercise physiologist to attain and maintain a weight that reduces my risk for developing diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and degenerative arthritis

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Each of these actions can be observed/measured and the results, documented. There exists no excuses.

Now that I have not only spoken — but transcribed — the vow for all to see, I guess I better follow through! Just don’t expect Adonis as the end result. Record of my progress will be kept and updated via this HealthyU Blog, so check back often!  I will report the results of my efforts and, hopefully, demonstrate the positive benefits of committing to a healthy lifestyle.

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UMC remains committed to the well-being of its staff and all who present themselves for care. To this end, the Primary Care Clinic, located at 2003 Tulane Avenue, opened on December 20th for all who wish to establish ongoing care with a primary care specialist.

If you desire to make the commitment to improve your health by losing weight and reducing your risk for developing serious medical conditions, please contact the office for an appointment. Dr. Rogers and I look forward to partnering with you in your quest for better health. Call the clinic directly at 504-962-6120.

A belated Happy New Year to all!