3 Summer Treats Perfect in this Heat

While not all may side with iHob’s decision to enter the burger industry, we can agree on this:

This summer is HOT!

GettyImages-496875851.jpg

With temperatures approaching triple digits, you may be reaching for popsicles, ice cream sandwiches and snoballs to cool you down. After all, you know what they say: “if you can’t take the heat, get out of the kitchen!” But before you overload on sugar and throw in the towel, consider a set of treats that are cool, healthy, and perfect for beating the heat.

Here are three healthy, dessert-style recipes you need to try this summer:

Stacked Fruit Salad

ce893a1c5801b8a6e1406456054801de--fruit-trifle-fruit-parfait.jpg

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons fat-free vanilla yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons fat-free ricotta cheese
  • 1/4 cup crushed pineapple, drained
  • 1/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup mandarin oranges
  • 1/2 small kiwi, peeled and sliced
  • 1 ring spiced apple

Directions

Mix the yogurt and ricotta cheese in a small bowl. Use a small spatula to smooth each layer as you add it to a parfait glass or a ring mold (place the mold on a plate). Spread 1/4 cup drained pineapple in the bottom. Spread half the yogurt-ricotta mixture over the pineapple. Top with a layer of blueberries. Mandarin orange segments come next, then another yogurt-ricotta layer. Arrange slices of peeled kiwi. Top with the spiced apple ring. Cover loosely and refrigerate, unless you’re ready to eat it at once. If you use the ring mold, some juice may leak out during refrigeration. Use a paper towel to dry the plate just before serving.

Serves: 1

The serving contains about 175 calories, 7 g protein, 0 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 38 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, and 56 mg sodium.

This dish is gluten-free.

Cherry Swirl Pudding

Cherry-Coconut-Yogurt-Bites-2.jpg

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fat-free plain yogurt
  • 2 cups sweet black cherries, pitted
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup dried, unsweetened coconut

Directions

Increase the yogurt’s density by putting it in a strainer lined with cheesecloth or a coffee filter over a bowl. Refrigerate. After 2 hours, you’ll see about 1/2 cup liquid to discard. Halve the cherries. Mix the cherries, vanilla extract, and coconut into the yogurt. Refrigerate until ready to serve in stemmed cocktail glasses (just spoon it in).

Serves: 4

Each serving contains about 145 calories, 8 g protein, 9 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 24 g carbohydrates, 4 g fiber, and 100 mg sodium.

This dish is gluten-free.

Pineapple Smoothies

pineapple-smoothie-recipe-2-740x925.jpg

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fresh pineapple chunks
  • 1 cup light vanilla yogurt
  • 1 cup crushed ice

Directions

Put ingredients in a blender. Puree and pour.

Serves: 2

Each serving contains about 110 calories, 5 g protein, 1 g fat, 23 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, and 66 mg sodium.

This dish is gluten-free and gout friendly.

Click here for more healthy recipes!

 

Feast Your Eye On This: A Thanksgiving Menu You Won’t Regret

Author: Rosetta Danigole, UMC Lead Clinical Dietitian – Nutritional Services

iStock-869771524.jpg

Thanksgiving is almost here.  It’s time to feast and spend time with family.  But while Thanksgiving and the rest of the holiday season brings joy to many, it can also be the cause of food anxiety.

iStock-673757202.jpg

Take a deep breath – traditional seasonal fare also offers plenty of good opportunities for healthy eating.

The fall season offers so many nutrient packed foods that can nourish not only your body but your spirit. Listed below are some dietitian approved tips for avoiding overindulging and taking the worry out of those holiday meals.

iStock-115212022.jpg

Remember always that healthy eating is a lifestyle. Moderation is the key to staying on your healthy eating path through the holidays.

Here are some tips to keep in mind as you prepare tomorrow’s feast or sit down to enjoy.

Make it healthy:

  • Choose seasonal foods. Roasted fall vegetables add a festive touch to the table. Think about sweet potatoes, carrots and turnips.  It’s a simple dish but these roasted vegetables combined with olive oil and low sodium herbs can be a good start to a healthy meal.
  • Add winter squash to your holiday table. Roasted, baked or steamed, winter squash makes a delicious and nutritious side dish.  Add your favorite spices such as nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon for a healthy alternative.
  • Make the cranberries a hit. Cranberries contain powerful anti-agers. Try to find either fresh or low sugar canned instead.
  • Prepare a guilt-free dessert. Baked, poached or roasted fall fruits are a great alternative to sugary pies and other sweets. Try apples and pears and even apricots, peaches and plums sprinkled with holiday spices like nutmeg and cinnamon.

iStock-187176633.jpg

Enjoy it!

  • Start with nuts. Instead of munching your way through the sour-cream dip before dinner, pick the walnuts out of the nut bowl. Eating 12 halves 30 minutes before a meal will convince your brain you’re not all that hungry.)
  • Practice the flip. Try this tip –it’s called flipping” your meal: Make the side dishes the main choices along with your white-meat turkey. Make the higher calorie choices a small side dish. When everyone else is waddling out, you’ll be feeling great.
  • Find a healthy balance. Try to balance your plate with lean proteins, heart healthy whole grains and veggies. If those options aren’t available, just remember to pace yourself.
  • Eat some of everything. Yes, including the pumpkin pie.  Just be mindful of portion sizes. To be sure you are getting the right portion size, use your hands. For the average woman, the palm of your hand is two to three ounces – your thumb is equal to one teaspoon. Take less and savor it more. You’ll end up feeling better after.
  • Dig in to the turkey. Turkey breast is super lean: just 44 calories, 1 gram of fat and no saturated fat per skinless ounce.
  • Don’t reach for seconds right away. Still hungry after your first serving? Wait 20 minutes, have a glass of water, and check in with your body before going for seconds.
  • Stay hydrated. Add sparkling seltzer water to cranberry or pomegranate juice for a festive, low-calorie drink (and it’s alcohol free, if so desired). Pomegranate juice is loaded with anti-oxidants and helps fight inflammation.

As you navigate the rest of the holiday season, remember that a healthy dietary pattern is higher in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low- or nonfat dairy, seafood, legumes and nuts; moderate in alcohol; lower in red and processed meat; and low in sugar-sweetened foods and drinks and refined grains.

For a list of healthy New Orleans-style Thanksgiving recipes, download our free recipe book.

ht1.jpg

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

You Are What You Eat: Lifestyle Tips for Managing Your Cholesterol

iStock-514419192.jpg

Author: Rosetta Danigole, Lead Dietitian at University Medical Center New Orleans

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, a good time to consider food and lifestyle choices that benefit your health and prevent illness like heart disease.

For a long time, dietary cholesterol was considered a risk factor for heart disease. More recent recommendations suggest foods high in dietary cholesterol and low in saturated fats – foods like eggs, shellfish and liver – are acceptable and not of as great a concern as once thought in increasing cholesterol levels for most of the population. Keep in mind, however, that saturated fats – those fats found in animal products and solid fats, such as red meat and butter – are still considered to raise cholesterol levels.

Nutrition is an emerging science and dietary recommendations may change, but there are some tried and true guidelines:

A healthy dietary pattern is higher in vegetables, fruits and whole grains, low or nonfat dairy, seafood, legumes and nuts.

It is moderate in alcohol and lower in red and processed meat and low in sugar-sweetened foods and drinks and refined grains.

More studies show it is not only about the cholesterol numbers.  It’s about the inflammatory process associated with disease.

In order to reduce inflammation and reduce the damage caused by oxidative stress and the negative effects of so-called “bad cholesterol,” here are some dietary tips:

  • Fruits and vegetables: At least 4 to 5 cups a day.
    • Nutrition Staff Tip: Try to make it 3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit for reduced sugar and calories.
  • Fish (preferably oily fish, like salmon): At least two 3.5-ounce servings a week.
    • Nutrition Staff Tip: While eating tilapia, for instance, is a good choice, the oily fish has more benefits — try it twice per week.
  • Fiber-rich whole grains: At least three 1-ounce servings a day.
    • Nutrition Staff Tip: Breakfast is a great time to get this one in. Try oatmeal instead of grits this month — but go easy on the brown sugar.
  • Nuts, legumes and seeds: At least 4 servings a week, opting for unsalted varieties whenever possible
    • Nutrition Staff Tip: Keep this as your snack daily — you only need a small handful. Portion it out when you get home and make 4-5 small bags per week so you won’t forget!

Other dietary measures:

  • Sodium: Less than 1,500 mg a day.
    • Remember: One teaspoon of salt contains 2,400 mg if sodium per day. Processed food is packed with sodium, so avoid processed foods and the salt shaker. Read labels!
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages: Excessive sugar is very inflammatory.  Avoid if at all possible. Drink water and herbal tea instead. Natural sweeteners such as Stevia seem to be a good choice.
  • Processed meats: Most people should try to avoid this altogether.  We suggest peanut butter, fresh tuna and chicken salad sandwiches with olive oil mayonnaise, and grilled chicken sandwiches to name some options. Also, there are other options such as bean burgers and hummus burgers if you want to try something new and vegetarian.
  • Saturated fat: The American Heart Association continues to recommend no more than 7% of your fat intake come from saturated fats. Trans fats have been of special concern over the last few years. Read your labels and be aware that anything that is a commercially baked good has the potential of some trans fats.

NOTE: Having a cholesterol level that is very low also has potential negative effects and may increase risk of dementia, autoimmune disorders and infections.

Try not to focus on the numbers. Focus on healthy lifestyles, healthy diet and exercise. Epidemiological data reveals that cardiovascular disease occurs within people who have low, normal and high cholesterol.  The implication from this is that total cholesterol is not the only marker for the assessment of cardiovascular risk.