Seat Safety is #HowWeSonic

Author: Bridget Gardner, RN, UMC Level 1 Trauma Center Injury Prevention Director 

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Every three minutes.

In Louisiana, someone is in a crash every three minutes. At the Level 1 Trauma Center at UMC, we see all too often the injuries and fatalities that result from motor vehicle crashes – and know that many of these injuries could have been prevented with proper protective equipment.

Motor vehicle injuries are the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 in Louisiana, according to the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals.

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Protective equipment that could prevent these injuries, such as car seats, booster seats and seat belts, are sometimes underutilized or not used correctly.

When used correctly, child restraints are the number one factor in reducing serious injuries and death in motor vehicle crashes.

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Recognizing that some families in Louisiana cannot afford to buy the proper child safety seats, Louisiana’s SONIC Drive In restaurants reached out to us to help. They’ve banded together to raise money for that purpose. SONIC Drive-In has created a “Tot” calendar – which is on sale through February 18 at 147 locations in the state.

If you are visiting UMC, be sure to stop by the hospital gift shop on the first floor, near Tower 1 to pick up a copy of this year’s calendar.

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Calendars are only $5 and all proceeds will be being directed to the Louisiana Passenger Safety Task Force to purchase and distribute child safety seats throughout the state. In addition to free car seat safety tips, the calendar offers more than $45 worth of coupons redeemable towards SONIC Drive-In purchases.

We are extremely appreciative of this partnership, which has raised $103,000 and provided nearly 2,000 child safety seats in just two years. It provides an avenue to reach the unrestrained and improperly restrained population to prevent the injuries that we far too often witness as a Level 1 Trauma Center. SONIC also supports National Seat Check Saturday, an annual statewide event hosted by the Louisiana Passenger Safety Task Force that provides free child safety seat inspections for all families. This event takes place in September during National Child Safety Week.

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If you aren’t sure if your child safety seat is installed correctly, FREE assistance from certified child safety technician is available very Wednesday in our area from 1-4 p.m. at Louisiana State Police Troop B, 2101 1-10 Service Road in Kenner.

As parents, we want to do everything we can to make sure our children are safe. When you ensure that your children are properly restrained in your vehicle, you can reduce serious injuries. Take this important step to make sure your child is safe, every trip and every time.

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For more information, go to www.umcno.org/injuryprevention

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Bridget Gardner, RN is a registered nurse and coordinator of the Community Injury Prevention Program at UMC New Orleans. The Louisiana Passenger Safety Task Force is a network of certified child passenger safety technicians throughout the state, directed by the UMC Trauma Program.

 

Stop the Bleed, Save a Life

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Authors: Jen Avegno, MD (LSU Emergency Medicine Physician) & Rebecca Schroll, MD (Tulane University Trauma Surgeon)

A nightclub. A country music concert. A Congressional baseball field. These are normally places of leisure and entertainment, but in the past year, they have become scenes of unimaginable tragedy where innocent victims have been targeted for mass murder and injury.

As doctors at University Medical Center’s renowned Level 1 Trauma Center and Emergency Department, treating victims of violent injury is our job and something we do every day. With our fellow dedicated team members, we are proud to serve our fellow Louisianans on what is often the worst day of their lives.

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Although we are professionals who are trained to handle anything that comes our way, it affects us personally, too.

We are mothers, wives, neighbors, and citizens of this great city – and it’s hard not to put ourselves in the shoes of the grieving family members and friends we see after a violent trauma.

When we talk to others about high-profile tragedies like the recent Las Vegas concert shooting or the Washington, D.C. shooting of Representative Scalise and others, we often hear remarks like “I feel helpless” or “there’s nothing I can do to help.”

And yet … there is.

Anyone can save a life – and UMCNO is making it easy to learn how.

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Through partnerships with our two medical schools, we are proud to bring the national Stop the Bleed program to our community. New Orleans has long held the dubious distinction of having one of the highest rates of violent trauma from shootings and stabbings; now it’s our turn to lead the way in turning the tide. Stop the Bleed was developed by the Department of Homeland Security and American College of Surgeons to teach anyone – especially non-medical personnel – the basic skills needed to identify and control life-threatening bleeding in any emergency situation.

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Imagine you’re jogging in the park and you come across someone with a badly broken leg who is losing blood rapidly. With Stop the Bleed training, you can quickly and easily stabilize the victim while EMS is on the way.  It’s an empowering feeling to know that YOU can save someone’s life, and a natural way to prove we are a community that cares for each other.

The only thing more tragic than a death is a death that could have been prevented.

Because we believe so strongly in this program, UMCNO is hosting FREE community classes every two weeks – open to anyone. Or, if you’d prefer, UMCNO medical staff can come to you and give a free training in your school, business, church or other organization.

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We have also put together special Bleeding Control kits containing the supplies that can be used to help stop bleeding.

Our goal is to put a kit in every school, place of worship, large building, and public space in the city.

Since the program started, UMCNO has trained nearly 1,000 of our neighbors, colleagues and friends. We’ve given the training in schools, organizations, security agencies – to anyone who’s asked.

In partnership with Ceasefire New Orleans, we have set up a great community training kick-off event October 16 at Kermit Ruffin’s Mother-in-Law Lounge. Come eat some great food and second-line while you learn some valuable skills!

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To learn more about Stop the Bleed at University Medical Center New Orleans or sign up for a class, visit: www.umcno.org/stopthebleed.

We lead the nation in celebrating life in New Orleans … together, let’s lead it in saving lives, too!

Facing Cancer: Head On

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Author: Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, Mervin L. Trail Endowed Chair in Head & Neck Oncology and Director of Salivary Endoscopy Service at University Medical Center New Orleans

When most people hear the word “cancer,” it’s likely that breast, prostate and lung cancers first come to mind.

However, few people realize that head and neck cancer accounts for four percent of all cancers in the United States.

Affecting twice as many men as they do women, head and neck cancers are projected to affect nearly 65,000 people in the world this year alone, killing roughly 14,000 of those afflicted.

Oral and head/neck cancers are unique because they directly affect the organs that allow us to communicate. Often living in the oral cavity of people’s mouths, these forms of cancer can also be found in the tonsils, voice box, throat, tongue or neck – specifically in a person’s lymph nodes. They leave lasting effects on appearance, speech, the sense of smell, eating, swallowing and even breathing.

Tobacco and alcohol are the most common risk factors for these forms of cancer.

Early screening is important before it’s too late.

University Medical Center New Orleans is offering free head and neck screenings on September 22 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the UMC Conference Center Room J.

If you are unfamiliar with head and neck cancer or want to learn more about the screening process, here’s what you should know:

About Screening

  • UMC is offering free oral cancer screening to the public on September 22.
  • Screening for head and neck cancer takes 1 minute or less.
  • An experienced physician will examine you using a non-painful and effective method for detecting oral cancers. He or she will examine your oral cavity and neck to evaluate and diagnose abnormal lesions of the mouth, neck, thyroid and salivary glands.
  • Oral screenings are NOT dental screenings.
  • If you are experiencing problems with your voice box or throat, a UMC physician will happily discuss these concerns in-person at the screening and then set up an appropriate follow-up appointment with our hospital’s ENT Clinic.

Why It’s Important

  • If detected early, cancer prognosis in stages 1 and 2 is significantly better than that of later cancer stages (stages 3-4).
  • Treatment can be administered with limited consequences to function.
    • Smaller and more functional operations (surgery or radiation) are possible; recovery times are much faster.
    • For late stage tumors, multiple treatment modalities have to be included (surgery + radiation + chemotherapy). Prognosis can be poor and recovery time often takes longer.
    • In later stages, there is a higher recurrence rate, longer rehabilitation and, often, permanent impact on function. This is when the need for a permanent tracheotomy, a feeding tube or disfiguring surgery comes into play.

How to Know if You Should Get Checked

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, it is best that you get screened:

  • Ulcer or growth or discoloration in the mouth that may not have gone away with treatment
  • Neck lump or mass (suggestive of spread to the lymph nodes in the neck)
  • Pain in the ear (with no prior ear disease)
  • Difficulty swallowing or changes in voice

How to Register for your Free Screening

Walk-ins are welcome, but we encourage you to pre-register using the form here on our website.

For more information on head and neck cancer types, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, please visit the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance online.