Show Us Your Green!

Author: Rosetta Danigole, UMC Lead Clinical Dietitian, Nutritional Services

Green is everyone’s favorite color on St. Patrick’s Day. If you’re looking to liven up your party or dinner table, you’re in luck.  Nature has a bounty of options that don’t require food coloring.

Here are a few St. Paddy’s favorites from the UMC Nutrition team:

Brussels sprouts – These are packed with vitamins A and C as well as birth-defect fighting folate and blood pressure-balancing potassium. Not into Brussels sprouts or kale? Consider such other cruciferous veggies as broccoli, arugula, and bok choy.

Kale – A member of the powerhouse family of greens known as cruciferous veggies (a fancy word for the cabbage family), kale has bone-boosting vitamin K, vision- and immune-boosting vitamin A, and even anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

Asparagus – This springtime vegetable is rich in vitamins K, C, A, and folate. It also has a number of anti-inflammatory nutrients. Asparagus is also famous for a healthy dose of inulin — a “prebiotic” that promotes digestive health.

Edamame – These soybeans are a longtime Japanese diet staple. A complete plant-based protein, edamame is a good protein source for vegetarian and vegan diets. When eaten in place of fatty meat, soy may lower cholesterol by reducing saturated fat intake

Green Beans – Also called string beans, green beans are a common side dish in Southern cooking. They’re loaded with fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar, making them an excellent choice for people with diabetes.

Try these healthful green recipes:

Luck of the Irish Green Smoothie

This smoothie is full of iron, potassium and vitamins and taste like a yummy treat.

Ingredients:

1 cup fresh spinach

1 cup almond milk/coconut milk- low sugar

½ cup pineapple

½ cup mango- optional

1 banana

 

Instructions:

  1. Tightly pack spinach in a measuring cup.
  2. Add spinach to blender with milk alternative.  Blend together until all chunks are gone.
  3. Add pineapple, mango and banana.
  4. Blend all ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
  5. Serve cold with ice if desired.

 

Calories: 202

Sodium: 30 milligrams (very low)

Carbohydrate: 51 grams—all from natural sources—fruits and vegetables

Fiber: 6 grams

Protein: 3 grams

 

Collard Greens  

Collard greens not only taste good, they supply a good dose of fiber, calcium, protein and iron. To keep this Southern staple healthy, keep the sodium low and skip the meat.

Number of Servings: 8
Serving Size:  1 cup

 

Ingredients:

4 lb collard greens

3 cups low fat, low sodium chicken broth

2 chopped onions

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

1 tsp pepper

 

Instructions:

  1. Wash and cut the collard greens and place them in a large stockpot. Add the remaining ingredients and enough water to cover.
  2. Cook until tender, stirring occasionally, about 3 1/2 hours. The flavors will blend even more if you let the greens sit for a bit after cooking.
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Be Mindful, B-WELL

Authors: Jennifer Hughes, Ph.D. (UMC Trauma Psychologist), Alisha Bowker (UMC Licensed Clinical Social Worker)iStock-639641818 (1).jpg

Mindfulness is defined as a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations.

Do you feel burnt out? Are you overworked? Do you feel as though you are at a crossroads in life? Are you happy?

Practicing mindfulness can help anyone who experiences stress, feels overwhelmed or battles with despair. It is proven to help many patients, too – especially those who have experienced trauma — learn how to cope with physical and emotional pain.

It also benefits healthcare professionals as they cope with stress after providing care to others, connect with patients, and work improve their quality of life.

For mental health professionals, this awareness helps reduce negative emotions and anxiety, and increases their positive emotions and feelings of self-compassion.

Research through Harvard University, the National Institutes of Health, and other leading healthcare agencies have shown that mindfulness can be effective, additionally, in reducing stress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and improving sleep and pain management.
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Starting a mindfulness practice can be as simple as following these steps:

  • Choose a specific time: Set aside a time and space each day to practice mindfulness. It can be the same time everyday or different times, whatever is best for you. Find a quiet place with few distractions and take a comfortable seat in a chair or on a pillow on the floor.
  • Observe the here and now: The goal of a mindfulness practice is not to quiet the mind; in fact, our mind is made to wander, so why fight its natural instincts! Instead, set the intention of paying attention to the present, the here and now, without judgment.
  • Allow your judgments to come and go: When your mind inevitably begins to wander, some of those thoughts may be judging the current situation (for better or worse). When these thoughts arise, make a mental note of their presence and let them pass, and return back to the here and now. Don’t get bogged down in the power of judgment!
  • Be kind to your wandering mind: When we practice mindfulness, it can be helpful to begin by welcoming all of ourselves, including our pesky wandering mind. When your mind begins to drift away from the present moment, don’t judge it or yourself. Practice noticing those thoughts and returning to the here and now. Welcome your mind just as it is. iStock-584608574.jpg

 Mindfulness can also help with:

  • Physical Pain: One of the most effective mindfulness practices to help ease physical pain is the body scan, which allows us to identify and “dive into” different body sensations. By first focusing on specific body sensations and then widening our awareness to our body as a whole can help us to identify less with our pain.
  • Stress, Anxiety/Trauma, and Depression:
    • Stress: mindfulness can reduce stress in the moment and give you skills that will help decrease the impact of stress in the future
    • Anxiety and Trauma: Mindfulness can help the brain respond to traumatic memories in less painful and more helpful ways. This helps reduce the negative impact of traumatic events and improve overall functioning
    • Depression: Mindfulness can help ease the symptoms of depression by decreasing the cycle of negative thought patterns, feelings, and behaviors. It can even help to improve relationships with others through breaking these cycles

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At University Medical Center New Orleans, we are working to address burnout and compassion fatigue by focusing on mindfulness and other wellness initiatives through B-WELL: a new program that aims to give back to our employees and encourage them to remember to take care of themselves.

Our advice to you?: Be mindful to work toward B(ing)-WELL.

For more information on mindfulness, check out these resources:

Online

Books

  • Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn
  • A Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Workbook by Bob Stahl, Ph.D. and Elisha Goldstein, Ph.D.

Free Smartphone Apps

  • Stop, Breathe & Think
  • Insight Timer
  • PTSD Coach
  • Mindfulness Coach
  • Headspace (Paid)