Top Items to Keep in Your Hurricane “Go-Bag”

Author: Melissa Mitchell, UMC Emergency Management Coordinator

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Hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. People living around the Atlantic coastline and the Gulf of Mexico should take note of the proper precautions for this hurricane season. Listed below are the top items every household should have ready to go in the event of a hurricane.

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1. Personal Identification

Consider including copies of the following items for each family member:

  • a driver’s license
  • social security card
  • birth/marriage certificates
  • vehicle registration
  • proof of insurance
  • will and insurance documents
  • property deeds

The best way to keep track of all information is to have it in a waterproof container or a binder, labeled, with a protective sleeve on it. During hurricane season there is always the potential threat of flooding and damaging important papers. The best solution for this problem would be to have all of it packaged and ready to go. And don’t forget to bring cash! ATM’s may not be operating.

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2. First Aid-Kit

To be prepared, a first aid kit is a must.  It would contain all health-related items and medicines a family may need, especially prescription medications. Each family member should have a list of medications that are prescribed to them and other important health concerns in this kit.   Include things like waterless hand cleaners, antibacterial soap, and sunblock.

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3. Toiletries

An emergency pack should always hold any toiletries a person would use daily. It is best to change out these items every hurricane season due to expiration dates. Items like deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, and personal should be included.

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4. Bottled Water

Water is a necessity and having it ready and bottled to go is essential. Each person should have one gallon of water per day.

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5. Food

At least 4 days’ worth for each person. It is best to pack the following types of food:

  • High Energy Foods: Along with water, high energy foods should be considered as well. High energy foods are foods that do not contain a high amount of water and would fill a person’s stomach up more. The best option to stack up on would be peanut butter, crackers, and protein or energy bars.
  • Pre-Packaged, Non-Perishable Food Items: Food items like oatmeal, mac and cheese, fruit snacks, and chips/pretzels are pre-packaged food that last a long time. A family should pack enough to accommodate family size and the pack should be updated and checked every hurricane season.

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6. Electronics

  • Flashlight: Each family member should have their own flashlight. Wind-up flashlights work very well and don’t require batteries.
  • Lantern: Even though flashlights are on the list, a lantern would be a good thing to have as well. The lantern would help in larger rooms and are easier to use if a person needs two hands to do a job.
  • Radio: The radio should be battery operated and the frequency for the weather channel can be taped to the radio itself.
  • Batteries: Batteries are a must have for being prepared for any inclement weather season.
  • Cell phone charger, computer cords, and a wind-up or solar powered cell phone charger.

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7. Clothes and Shoes

Enough for 4 days per person. Be sure you have:

  • Rain jacket
  • Protective shoes
  • Hat for shade

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8. Pets

  • Pet food
  • Veterinarian info & medications
  • Bottle water and bowls
  • Carrier or crate
  • Bedding
  • Tags, collar, and leash
  • Plastic refuse bags or litter

With the top items listed above, every family should print and review the Louisiana Emergency Preparedness Guide.  This guide will have everything a Louisiana resident should have on hand to be prepared this hurricane season.

For more information on Emergency Preparedness or helpful tips, visit: 

 

For up-to-date emergency alerts, follow your local news and weather channels.

Click here to watch how to pack a basic storm survival kit.

Safe and…Sound: Tips for Voice Conservation During Mardi Gras

Author: Kevin Hemenger, UMC Speech Pathologist

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Most of us take our voice for granted—it’s there when we need it, and we don’t think much about it. But when your voice isn’t working right, it can cause serious problems, like one of these vocal disorders. It is important to take care of your vocal health just like you take care of other aspects of your health.

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You have two vocal cords located in your throat a little below the jawline (behind the Adam’s apple in men). The vocal cords are made of very delicate tissue that vibrates to produce voice. They stretch and contract at the same time to produce all of the different sounds and pitches that we use while talking and singing.

If the vocal cords are overused, they can become inflamed and swollen, so they don’t vibrate as well, causing the voice to sound hoarse. With repeated or frequent overuse, the vocal cords can be injured. Depending on the injury, this can require speech therapy or surgery.

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It’s easy to get carried away at parades, sporting events, concerts, and other festive occasions and overuse your voice. In these situations, you should avoid yelling above your typical conversational level.

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Tips for Saving Your Voice

  • Try clapping, waving, or whistling instead.
  • A “noisemaker” is also a good way to express your excitement.
  • If you know someone riding in a parade, make a sign to get their attention—it’s easier for the rider to spot you that way too!

It’s important to drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids. 

Your vocal cords are very susceptible to dehydration. Be sure to have water or juice with you on the parade route and drink plenty of these throughout the day.

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If you do overuse your voice and find that you are hoarse the next day, rest your voice as much as possible and drink plenty of fluids. Typically, a one-time voice overuse will take care of itself in a couple of days.

If your voice is hoarse for more than a month with no improvement, then you should consider making an appointment with an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) physician, who will take a look at your vocal cords and may refer you to Speech Therapy.

To make an appointment with an ENT at UMC, please call (504) 702-5700. Our ENT Clinic is located on the 3rd floor of the Ambulatory Care Building (ACB) in Zone C.

Stay safe and SOUND this Mardi Gras Season!

Feast Your Eye On This: A Thanksgiving Menu You Won’t Regret

Author: Rosetta Danigole, UMC Lead Clinical Dietitian – Nutritional Services

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Thanksgiving is almost here.  It’s time to feast and spend time with family.  But while Thanksgiving and the rest of the holiday season brings joy to many, it can also be the cause of food anxiety.

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Take a deep breath – traditional seasonal fare also offers plenty of good opportunities for healthy eating.

The fall season offers so many nutrient packed foods that can nourish not only your body but your spirit. Listed below are some dietitian approved tips for avoiding overindulging and taking the worry out of those holiday meals.

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Remember always that healthy eating is a lifestyle. Moderation is the key to staying on your healthy eating path through the holidays.

Here are some tips to keep in mind as you prepare tomorrow’s feast or sit down to enjoy.

Make it healthy:

  • Choose seasonal foods. Roasted fall vegetables add a festive touch to the table. Think about sweet potatoes, carrots and turnips.  It’s a simple dish but these roasted vegetables combined with olive oil and low sodium herbs can be a good start to a healthy meal.
  • Add winter squash to your holiday table. Roasted, baked or steamed, winter squash makes a delicious and nutritious side dish.  Add your favorite spices such as nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon for a healthy alternative.
  • Make the cranberries a hit. Cranberries contain powerful anti-agers. Try to find either fresh or low sugar canned instead.
  • Prepare a guilt-free dessert. Baked, poached or roasted fall fruits are a great alternative to sugary pies and other sweets. Try apples and pears and even apricots, peaches and plums sprinkled with holiday spices like nutmeg and cinnamon.

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Enjoy it!

  • Start with nuts. Instead of munching your way through the sour-cream dip before dinner, pick the walnuts out of the nut bowl. Eating 12 halves 30 minutes before a meal will convince your brain you’re not all that hungry.)
  • Practice the flip. Try this tip –it’s called flipping” your meal: Make the side dishes the main choices along with your white-meat turkey. Make the higher calorie choices a small side dish. When everyone else is waddling out, you’ll be feeling great.
  • Find a healthy balance. Try to balance your plate with lean proteins, heart healthy whole grains and veggies. If those options aren’t available, just remember to pace yourself.
  • Eat some of everything. Yes, including the pumpkin pie.  Just be mindful of portion sizes. To be sure you are getting the right portion size, use your hands. For the average woman, the palm of your hand is two to three ounces – your thumb is equal to one teaspoon. Take less and savor it more. You’ll end up feeling better after.
  • Dig in to the turkey. Turkey breast is super lean: just 44 calories, 1 gram of fat and no saturated fat per skinless ounce.
  • Don’t reach for seconds right away. Still hungry after your first serving? Wait 20 minutes, have a glass of water, and check in with your body before going for seconds.
  • Stay hydrated. Add sparkling seltzer water to cranberry or pomegranate juice for a festive, low-calorie drink (and it’s alcohol free, if so desired). Pomegranate juice is loaded with anti-oxidants and helps fight inflammation.

As you navigate the rest of the holiday season, remember that a healthy dietary pattern is higher in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low- or nonfat dairy, seafood, legumes and nuts; moderate in alcohol; lower in red and processed meat; and low in sugar-sweetened foods and drinks and refined grains.

For a list of healthy New Orleans-style Thanksgiving recipes, download our free recipe book.

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Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Hidden Scar Surgery: It’s No Secret

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Scars on your soul

Scars on your skin;

Some on the outside

Some are within;

Some have a story;

Some are unwritten;

Some you can see

But most are quite hidden.

-EP

Each year, more than 400,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer that requires surgery, and each year, these women carry with them burdens of fear, sometimes hair loss and, most noticeably, surgical scars.

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When considering breast procedures, many are unaware of the number of surgical options that are available: mastectomies, lumpectomies, reconstruction and, now, Hidden Scar Breast Cancer™ Surgery – a minimally invasive approach aimed to help women restore their self-image and begin the emotional healing process.

UMC New Orleans is among the first of hospitals in the Greater New Orleans area to offer this procedure, which is an advanced approach that hides incision scars and minimizes the daily emotional reminder of a breast cancer diagnosis for patients.

Adam I. Riker, MD, FACS, LSU Health New Orleans, breast surgical oncologist at UMC New Orleans, has been recognized as a Hidden Scar trained surgeon.

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 “In many instances, the incisions cannot be seen at all, as it is hidden in the inframammary fold of the breast,” Dr. Riker said, “and in select cases, the nipple can be completely preserved. This technology is exciting because it allows me to truly hide, as best as possible, the incisions that must be made for a particular breast operation.”

Breast cancer can be traditionally removed with a mastectomy procedure (in which all of your breast tissue is removed) or a lumpectomy procedure (in which only part of your breast tissue is removed).

With a Hidden Scar Approach to these procedures, Dr. Riker can place an incision in a location that is hard to see, so that the scar is not visible when your incision heals. As a result, you have little to no visible reminder of the surgery.

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The Hidden Scar approach can be performed for a nipple sparing mastectomy or a lumpectomy procedure. Patients who undergo the Hidden Scar approach do not have a higher risk of cancer recurrence than patients who undergo any other type of technique.

You may qualify for Hidden Scar Breast Cancer Surgery based on the size and location of your tumor, your breast shape, and your breast size.

To learn more about Hidden Scar Breast Cancer Surgery and other Services we offer for patients with cancer, visit www.umcno.org/hiddenscar