Top Items to Keep in Your Hurricane “Go-Bag”

Author: Melissa Mitchell, UMC Emergency Management Coordinator

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Hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. People living around the Atlantic coastline and the Gulf of Mexico should take note of the proper precautions for this hurricane season. Listed below are the top items every household should have ready to go in the event of a hurricane.

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1. Personal Identification

Consider including copies of the following items for each family member:

  • a driver’s license
  • social security card
  • birth/marriage certificates
  • vehicle registration
  • proof of insurance
  • will and insurance documents
  • property deeds

The best way to keep track of all information is to have it in a waterproof container or a binder, labeled, with a protective sleeve on it. During hurricane season there is always the potential threat of flooding and damaging important papers. The best solution for this problem would be to have all of it packaged and ready to go. And don’t forget to bring cash! ATM’s may not be operating.

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2. First Aid-Kit

To be prepared, a first aid kit is a must.  It would contain all health-related items and medicines a family may need, especially prescription medications. Each family member should have a list of medications that are prescribed to them and other important health concerns in this kit.   Include things like waterless hand cleaners, antibacterial soap, and sunblock.

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3. Toiletries

An emergency pack should always hold any toiletries a person would use daily. It is best to change out these items every hurricane season due to expiration dates. Items like deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, and personal should be included.

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4. Bottled Water

Water is a necessity and having it ready and bottled to go is essential. Each person should have one gallon of water per day.

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5. Food

At least 4 days’ worth for each person. It is best to pack the following types of food:

  • High Energy Foods: Along with water, high energy foods should be considered as well. High energy foods are foods that do not contain a high amount of water and would fill a person’s stomach up more. The best option to stack up on would be peanut butter, crackers, and protein or energy bars.
  • Pre-Packaged, Non-Perishable Food Items: Food items like oatmeal, mac and cheese, fruit snacks, and chips/pretzels are pre-packaged food that last a long time. A family should pack enough to accommodate family size and the pack should be updated and checked every hurricane season.

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6. Electronics

  • Flashlight: Each family member should have their own flashlight. Wind-up flashlights work very well and don’t require batteries.
  • Lantern: Even though flashlights are on the list, a lantern would be a good thing to have as well. The lantern would help in larger rooms and are easier to use if a person needs two hands to do a job.
  • Radio: The radio should be battery operated and the frequency for the weather channel can be taped to the radio itself.
  • Batteries: Batteries are a must have for being prepared for any inclement weather season.
  • Cell phone charger, computer cords, and a wind-up or solar powered cell phone charger.

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7. Clothes and Shoes

Enough for 4 days per person. Be sure you have:

  • Rain jacket
  • Protective shoes
  • Hat for shade

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8. Pets

  • Pet food
  • Veterinarian info & medications
  • Bottle water and bowls
  • Carrier or crate
  • Bedding
  • Tags, collar, and leash
  • Plastic refuse bags or litter

With the top items listed above, every family should print and review the Louisiana Emergency Preparedness Guide.  This guide will have everything a Louisiana resident should have on hand to be prepared this hurricane season.

For more information on Emergency Preparedness or helpful tips, visit: 

 

For up-to-date emergency alerts, follow your local news and weather channels.

Click here to watch how to pack a basic storm survival kit.

Stop the Bleed, Save a Life

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Authors: Jen Avegno, MD (LSU Emergency Medicine Physician) & Rebecca Schroll, MD (Tulane University Trauma Surgeon)

A nightclub. A country music concert. A Congressional baseball field. These are normally places of leisure and entertainment, but in the past year, they have become scenes of unimaginable tragedy where innocent victims have been targeted for mass murder and injury.

As doctors at University Medical Center’s renowned Level 1 Trauma Center and Emergency Department, treating victims of violent injury is our job and something we do every day. With our fellow dedicated team members, we are proud to serve our fellow Louisianans on what is often the worst day of their lives.

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Although we are professionals who are trained to handle anything that comes our way, it affects us personally, too.

We are mothers, wives, neighbors, and citizens of this great city – and it’s hard not to put ourselves in the shoes of the grieving family members and friends we see after a violent trauma.

When we talk to others about high-profile tragedies like the recent Las Vegas concert shooting or the Washington, D.C. shooting of Representative Scalise and others, we often hear remarks like “I feel helpless” or “there’s nothing I can do to help.”

And yet … there is.

Anyone can save a life – and UMCNO is making it easy to learn how.

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Through partnerships with our two medical schools, we are proud to bring the national Stop the Bleed program to our community. New Orleans has long held the dubious distinction of having one of the highest rates of violent trauma from shootings and stabbings; now it’s our turn to lead the way in turning the tide. Stop the Bleed was developed by the Department of Homeland Security and American College of Surgeons to teach anyone – especially non-medical personnel – the basic skills needed to identify and control life-threatening bleeding in any emergency situation.

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Imagine you’re jogging in the park and you come across someone with a badly broken leg who is losing blood rapidly. With Stop the Bleed training, you can quickly and easily stabilize the victim while EMS is on the way.  It’s an empowering feeling to know that YOU can save someone’s life, and a natural way to prove we are a community that cares for each other.

The only thing more tragic than a death is a death that could have been prevented.

Because we believe so strongly in this program, UMCNO is hosting FREE community classes every two weeks – open to anyone. Or, if you’d prefer, UMCNO medical staff can come to you and give a free training in your school, business, church or other organization.

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We have also put together special Bleeding Control kits containing the supplies that can be used to help stop bleeding.

Our goal is to put a kit in every school, place of worship, large building, and public space in the city.

Since the program started, UMCNO has trained nearly 1,000 of our neighbors, colleagues and friends. We’ve given the training in schools, organizations, security agencies – to anyone who’s asked.

In partnership with Ceasefire New Orleans, we have set up a great community training kick-off event October 16 at Kermit Ruffin’s Mother-in-Law Lounge. Come eat some great food and second-line while you learn some valuable skills!

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To learn more about Stop the Bleed at University Medical Center New Orleans or sign up for a class, visit: www.umcno.org/stopthebleed.

We lead the nation in celebrating life in New Orleans … together, let’s lead it in saving lives, too!